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Tag: Promotion

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Published Document Title Authors Pages Abstract
March 2015 Read to Achieve Traditional Calendar School Reading Camps: Summer 2014 Rhea, Anisa

58 View Abstract

This report examines traditional calendar school Read to Achieve reading camps implemented in the summer of 2014. Teacher and student survey respondents reported positive reading camp experiences and reading camp was well attended. Based on data for 502 students, a small percentage (16.1%) reached reading proficiency by the end of camp. Gains in literacy, as measured by an increase in pre- and post-Read to Achieve (RTA) test scale scores were found for about two-thirds of the students and were most evident for the lowest performing students. Results from a multi-level model show that students’ performance on assessments given in the spring was the best predictor of their post-camp reading proficiency with very little variation across sites. This suggests consistent implementation across sites and the opportunity for students to have a similar camp experience.Study recommendations include improving data collection to better support reading camp planning and evaluation, considering more than one instructional delivery model for future reading camps, and bolstering early literacy for students prior to third grade as a proactive measure.

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July 2014 Dropout Rate for WCPSS: 2012-13 Gilleland, Kevin
McMillen, Brad
Muli, Juliana

8 View Abstract

Despite increases in student membership each year, WCPSS continues to maintain a steady decline in dropout counts. In 2012-13, the WCPSS high school dropout rate fell to 1.95%, its lowest rate ever. The WCPSS rate is lower than the state's rate, and also the lowest of the other four large school districts in North Carolina (Guilford 2.07%, Forsyth 2.72%, Mecklenburg 3.02%, and Durham 3.21%). WCPSS dropout rates by ethnicity in 2012-13 also fell for all subgroups, with Black/African-American students experiencing the largest drop of 1.8 percentage points, from 4.6% in 2011-12 to 2.8% in 2012-13.

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May 2014 WCPSS High School Graduation Rates: 2012-13 Regan, Roger

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The WCPSS four-year cohort graduation rate increased slightly from 80.6% in 2011-12 to 81.0% in 2012-13. Over the past five years, the overall rate has increased 2.6 percentage points and is now at its highest point since 2005-06. In contrast to the 2011-12 cohort, graduation rates declined slightly for economically disadvantaged students (64.9%), and students with disabilities (59.6%). Four-year cohort graduation rates at the 25 WCPSS high schools with graduating classes ranged from 68.3% to more than 95% in 2012-13. Rates increased at nine schools and declined at 15 schools. Follow-up analysis of the 2012-13 cohort also shed light on the characteristics of non-graduates and the relationship between early literacy and graduation rates.

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December 2013 High School Retention Rate: 2011-12 Paeplow, Colleen

32 View Abstract

Retention means repeating one or more courses in high school, rather than a full grade. Over 3,500 high school students were retained in 2011-12 in WCPSS, with the largest numbers in grades 9 and 10. Some students enter high school below grade level. In 2011-12, half the WCPSS high schools had greater than 30% of students entering 9th grade below grade level in reading and greater than 20% below grade level in mathematics based on EOG scores from grade 8. Of retained students in grade 9: nearly two thirds failed English I; more than half failed science and social studies; and nearly half failed mathematics. In addition, 1 in 5 retained students in grade 9 passed English I, but were missing credit in another course subject. While high schools have resources for students performing below grade level (e.g.,"bridging" courses and general supports) the supports examined were limited and/or underutilized, with the exception of mathematics support courses. Fewer than 15% of students who entered high school below grade level were enrolled in a reading support course. Based on the study's findings, it is recommended that staff: identify and utilize early indicators to determine students in need of extra support; find ways to increase the availability and usage of middle and high school supports for struggling students and monitor their success; and examine practices that may help lower retention rates.

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December 2013 Limited English Proficient Students: Progress of 2008-09 High School Cohort Baenen, Nancy

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Students with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) entering U.S. schools in grade 9 face a tight timeline to simultaneously learn English and graduate from high school in four or five years. Based on the cohort of LEP students who entered WCPSS for the first time in grade 9 in 2008-09 and did not transfer out, 46% graduated within 4.5 years. Some (17%) graduated while still LEP. Cohort graduates tended to start ninth grade with greater initial English proficiency, strong educational backgrounds obtained elsewhere, or high motivation and support. Unfortunately, 41% of the cohort dropped out of high school. Early warning indicators include not passing required courses and being retained (only one third of the cohort was able to be promoted every year). Only 20% participated in ESL support programs outside of school (36% of those with the lowest English proficiency participated).

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March 2013 WCPSS High School Graduation Rates 4-Year and 5-Year Cohort Rates 2011-12 Regan, Roger

13 View Abstract

The WCPSS four-year cohort graduation rate declined slightly to 80.6% in 2011-12 from 80.9% in the previous year. At the same time, the five-year rate rose substantially from 81.6% to 84.4%.

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January 2013 Promotion Retention Rates, 2011-12 Paeplow, Colleen

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The vast majority of WCPSS' students are promoted to the next grade level at the end of each school year. Only 3.4% of students were retained within grade in 2011-12; however, this rate varies considerably by grade, school level, school, and student subgroup. High school students represent over three fourths of retained students with the highest retention at grades 9 and 10. For a high school student, retention may mean repeating as few as one course (rather than a full grade). Limited English proficient (LEP) students were three to four times as likely to be retained as non-LEP students in elementary, middle, and high school. This tripling of retention was most notable at the high school level, where nearly a third of LEP high school students were retained overall, including nearly 40% of LEP students in grade 9. Furthermore, approximately 20% of economically disadvantaged (ED) students and students with disabilities (SWD) were retained in high school. Given the elevated retention rates within some grades and student subgroups, further investigation into retention is merited and planned.

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January 2013 WCPSS Dropout Rate: 2011-12 Gilleland, Kevin
Muli, Juliana

3 View Abstract

On January 10, 2013 the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (DPI) released its annual statewide Dropout Report covering the 2011-12 school year. Charts show the dropout rate for WCPSS compared to the state as a whole, to other large school districts in North Carolina, and by selected student subgroups.

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March 2011 2009-10 WCPSS Dropout Rate Gilleland, Kevin

5 View Abstract

On March 3rd, 2011, the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (DPI) released its annual statewide Dropout Report covering the 2009-10 school year. Charts show the dropout rate for WCPSS compared to the state as a whole, to other large school districts in North Carolina, and by the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) subgroups.

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January 2011 ABCs and AYP Results, WCPSS: 2009-10 Haynie, Glenda

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In 2009-10, 92% of WCPSS schools met Expected or High Growth as measured by the North Carolina ABCs program, a 3.5 percentage point increase from 2008-09. Fifty-four percent of the schools made High Growth and 38% made Expected Growth. All subgroups saw their percentages of students meeting growth increase to above 55% in 2009-10; with the "All Students" group above 60% (the state's definition of High Growth for a school). Slightly more than 90% of WCPSS schools were in the recognition categories Honor Schools of Excellence (5.8%), Schools of Excellence (3.2%), Schools of Distinction (40.6%), or Schools of Progress (40.6%). Yet there was a substantial decrease in the number of schools making AYP (38.4%) compared to 2008-09 (62.8%). The decrease in 2009-10 can partly be explained by the one-year effect of retests that benefitted schools in 2008-09, and the invalidation of tests for high school occupational course of study students by the U.S. Department of Education. There were a much greater proportion of schools that met High Growth among the schools that met AYP (71.7%) than among those that did not meet AYP (43.2%).

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June 2010 End-of-Grade (EOG) Multiple-Choice Test Results, 2008-09 McMillen, Brad

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In 2008-09, results from End-of-Grade (EOG) reading and mathematics tests in WCPSS continued to demonstrate an upward trend across grade levels and student subgroups. Disaggregation of results by ethnicity, income level, disability status, and English proficiency status showed that achievement gaps between historically underperforming subgroups and their peers are still significant but are closing. Results of the new EOG science test in grades 5 and 8 showed that proficiency rates in science are below those for reading and mathematics. The effect of retesting for students who fail to score proficient on the first administration of EOG tests indicated that retesting improved proficiency rates by 4-9 percentage points, and that some groups of students benefited more than others from retesting.

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May 2010 End-of-Course Multiple-Choice Test Results, 2008-09 McMillen, Brad

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End-of-Course (EOC) tests are given statewide in 10 courses typically taken in high school. Results for 2008-09 (and prior years, where available) are reported in terms of both average scale scores and the percentage of students scoring proficient. After the recent introduction of new EOC tests with higher standards, scores in WCPSS have begun to move back upward after an initial decline. Significant gaps in achievement are still evident, and proficiency rates have not fully recovered to the levels seen prior to these new tests. However, historically-underperforming subgroups have made significant gains, and have begun to close those gaps. Further acceleration of those gains will be important for ensuring that all students are prepared for their post-secondary futures.

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March 2010 2008-09 WCPSS Dropout Rate Gilleland, Kevin

5 View Abstract

On February 5th, 2009, the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction released its annual statewide Dropout Report covering the 2007-08 school year. Charts show the dropout rate for WCPSS compared to the state as a whole, to other large school districts in North Carolina, and by race.

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March 2010 The Relationship between High School Course Grades and Exam Scores Boykin, Anne-Sylvie

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Since the 2006-07 school year, in addition to earning a certain number of course credits, all North Carolina high school students have been required to pass the End of Course test (EOC) in five subjects in order to obtain a high school diploma. This report examines the relationship between EOC test results and course grades for Algebra I and English I, two of the subjects that are part of the new graduation requirements. Analyses are presented for two subsets of students: the students who failed the EOC test but passed the course and the students who passed the EOC test but failed the course. The size of the first subset decreased over the four-year period, while the size of the second one increased. Differences were observed among subgroups, in particular between gender, with female students having a greater chance of passing the course in comparison to male students with similar results on the EOC test.

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January 2010 NovaNET 2008-09 Evaluation Bulgakov-Cooke, Dina

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NovaNET is a technology-based teacher-facilitated educational approach used at schools to support students at risk of not meeting graduation requirements to accrue credits in a variety of subjects. NovaNET contributes to the WCPSS goal of closing achievement gaps and creating opportunities for all students to graduate on time. In 2008-09, 38 NovaNET courses were offered districtwide. All high schools offered credit recovery (CR) courses. Six schools offered remediation opportunities, and 11 offered new credits. Based on summer courses, NovaNET had a high success rate in helping students earn credits towards graduation. Based on high summer pass rates, it is recommended to encourage use of NovaNET to earn course credits, examine ways to enhance EOC performance, designate use of NovaNET within course codes, streamline reporting methods, and enhance monitoring of success. Consider expanded use of NovaNET as a supplement for regular courses. Based on cost-effectiveness, expand student access to NovaNET in summer if feasible.

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June 2009 Algebra I Performance in Year-Long versus Semester-Long Courses Holdzkom, David

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This study examined differences in student achievement between 9th grade students who took Algebra I in a twopart, year-long sequence and those who took a one-semester Algebra I course. Results indicated higher proficiency rates and higher growth results for students in the year-long sequence, especially for students who scored below Achievement Level IV on their 8th Grade Mathematics EOG test. Schools are urged to use these results to make data-based scheduling decisions for 9th grade Algebra I students.

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June 2009 Factors Associated with Staying on Track to Graduate: Evidence from the WCPSS 9th Grade Class of 2005-06 Gilleland, Kevin
McMillen, Brad

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Given that graduating from high school on time prepared for the future is the ultimate outcome of the K-12 education process, then an understanding of the factors that distinguish students who do from students who do not becomes important. This study looked at data from the WCPSS 9th grade class of 2005-06 in an effort to document some of the factors that separated students who stayed on track to graduate from those who either got behind or dropped out. Results indicated that several demographic, program, and achievement factors were associated with staying ontime to graduate during high school. These results should help schools better identify students who might be at risk for not graduating on time.

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February 2009 2007-08 WCPSS Dropout Rate Gilleland, Kevin
Holdzkom, David

4 View Abstract

2007-08 WCPSS Dropout Rate

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February 2009 North Carolina Virtual Public School in WCPSS Update for Fall 2007, Spring 2008, and Summer 2008 Baenen, Nancy
Bulgakov-Cooke, Dina

33 View Abstract

North Carolina Virtual Public School (NCVPS) has changed since summer 2007, with more traditional courses and fewer credit-recovery courses. Total NCVPS initial enrollments of Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) students were much lower in Fall 2007 (139), Spring 2008 (198), and Summer 2008 (430) than in Summer 2007 (1,378). Students were more likely to complete courses after Summer 2007. However, students enrolled in Fall 2007 and Spring 2008 were more likely to drop courses with failure after the deadline than to do so before the cutoff date. Percentages of final enrollments with passing NCVPS course grades increased from 47% in Summer 2007 to 64%, 84%, and 70% in the fall, spring, and summer, respectively. In Summer 2008, pass rates for EOC courses were somewhat lower than for other courses, with relatively low pass rates on EOC tests.

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January 2009 Best Practices to Promote High School Graduation Baenen, Nancy

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Significant attention and resources have been focused on reforming high schools to enhance graduation rates. The research literature supports the following practices: For struggling students, accurate identification and intensive instructional, monitoring, and counseling support For 9th graders, transition activities, personalization, and academic support strategies For teachers, intensive training to help them provide effective instruction and support, particularly for students showing signs of risk.

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January 2009 Overview of Practices to Promote High School Graduation Baenen, Nancy

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Significant attention and resources have been focused on reforming high schools to enhance graduation rates. The research literature supports the following practices: For struggling students, accurate identification and intensive instructional, monitoring, and counseling support For 9th graders, transition activities, personalization, and academic support strategies For teachers, intensive training to help them provide effective instruction and support, particularly for students showing signs of risk.

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October 2008 Wake County Public School System K-5 Assessment Results 2007-08 Districtwide Summary Jackl, Andrew

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In 2007-08, WCPSS K-5 assessment results were similar to past years. Some changes were implemented in the writing assessment methods. The percentage of students demonstrating proficiency was 85% for book level standards and 72% for reading strands. Mathematics mastery was 69% of students. Writing results for strands was 52%, content rubric was 69%, and conventions rubric was 57%. Differences by subject likely reflect differences in standards for the assessments. NCLB subgroup analyses revealed gaps between ethnic groups and groups with and without risk factors. Between 2006-07 and 2007-08, notable improvements were evident for Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, and Limited English Proficient populations, helping to close the achievement gaps slightly.

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April 2008 WCPSS High School Student Outcomes: 2006-07 Baenen, Nancy

108 View Abstract

Many indicators of performance, persistence, and academic rigor for WCPSS high school students point toward the relative success of WCPSS high school students. Student achievement remains high compared to state and national results, and an increasing number of students are pursuing rigorous AP coursework in high school. The skills and abilities that WCPSS graduates obtain appear to serve them well in the University of North Carolina (UNC) system, which is the most common educational destination for WCPSS graduates. However, changing student populations and rising academic standards are challenging the system's ability to sustain and increase academic performance for all students. Gaps in achievement have increased, with higher percentages of minority students and students with academic risk factors at risk of not graduating on time, compared to other groups.

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April 2008 WCPSS Middle School Student Outcomes: 2006-07 McMillen, Brad

81 View Abstract

This report draws together various academic performance results for middle school students in WCPSS. Generally speaking, students in grades 6-8 continue to do well on most achievement measures, but there are significant gaps in outcomes between different student subgroups, including ethnic groups, program groups, and also between male and female students. Analysis of student outcomes is provided at the grade level as well as for subgroups. This report also describes demographic trends that impact our student outcomes as well as information about students retained in grade. Finally, the report provides summaries of several research and evaluation efforts related to effective practices for promoting student achievement.

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April 2008 Wake County Public Schools (WCPSS) Elementary School Student Outcomes: 2006-07 Holdzkom, David

92 View Abstract

This report draws together various academic performance results for elementary students in WCPSS. Generally speaking, students in grades K-5 continue to do well on most literacy measures, but there has been a decline in mathematics EOG performance, largely resulting from the State Board of Education's action to create more rigorous cut scores for achievement levels. Analysis of student outcomes is provided at the grade level as well as for subgroups. This report describes demographic trends that impact our student outcomes as well as information about students retained in grade. Finally, the report provides summaries of several research and evaluation efforts related to effective practices for promoting student achievement.

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February 2008 2006-07 WCPSS Dropout Rate Gilleland, Kevin

4 View Abstract

2006-07 WCPSS Dropout Rate

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February 2008 Public Issues Confronting the WCPSS Board of Education as Perceived by Focus Group Interview Participants Baenen, Nancy
Holdzkom, David

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In an effort to understand the issues that the citizens of Wake County believe confront the Board of Education, two focus group interviews were conducted in November 2007 with the Community Relations Committee (CRC). The two groups both identified population growth as a major root cause of many of the issues confronting the school system. Many of the issues identified by the interviewed groups may be thought of as nested, or embedded. The focus group interviews identified three major impacts of this rapid growth on the school district: providing high quality facilities and educational programs, creating a student assignment plan that is fair and provides some measure of predictability, and coping with the increasing diversity of the student population.

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August 2007 WCPSS Students with Multiple Academic Risks: Achievement Patterns and School Experiences Baenen, Nancy
Ives, Sarah
Paeplow, Colleen
Reichstetter, Rosemary

112 View Abstract

This study focused on effective practices for students with multiple academic risk factors (students with disabilities, students eligible for free or reduced price lunch, and/or students with limited English proficiency). Achievement performance patterns over several years differ between students making stronger and weaker achievement growth on End-of-Grade tests. Sixteen case studies of 5th and 8th graders revealed that students with positive achievement patterns were more likely to show signs of resilience in their personal characteristics, school experiences, and/or home support than were students with negative achievement patterns. Teachers of both groups used some methods recommended in national research (such as small-group work, structure, and collaboration). A specific focus on language development was not mentioned. Homework was a common problem.

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March 2007 WCPSS Elementary School Student Outcomes 2005-06 Baenen, Nancy
Holdzkom, David

99 View Abstract

This report draws together various academic performance results for elementary students in WCPSS. Generally speaking, students in grades K-5 continue to do well on most literacy measures, but there has been a decline in mathematics EOG performance, largely resulting from the State Board of Education's action to create more rigorous cut scores for achievement levels. Analysis of student outcomes is provided at the grade level as well as for subgroups. This report describes demographic trends that impact our student outcomes as well as information about students retained in grade. Finally, the report provides summaries of several research and evaluation efforts related to effective practices for promoting student achievement.

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March 2007 WCPSS High School Student Outcomes 2005-06 Holdzkom, David
McMillen, Brad

93 View Abstract

Looking across various indicators of performance, persistence, and academic rigor for WCPSS high school students, many indicators point toward the relative success of WCPSS high school students. Student achievement remains high compared to state and national results, and an increasing number of students are pursuing rigorous AP coursework in high school. In addition, the skills and abilities that WCPSS graduates obtain appear to serve them well in the UNC system, which is the most common post-high school educational destination for WCPSS graduates. However, significant challenges remain related to changing student populations and rising academic standards which are challenging the system's ability to sustain and increase academic performance for all students.

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March 2007 WCPSS Middle School Student Outcomes 2005-06 Baenen, Nancy
Holdzkom, David

84 View Abstract

This report draws together various academic performance results for middle school students in WCPSS. Generally speaking, students in grades 6-8 continue to do well on most literacy measures, but there has been a decline in mathematics EOG performance, largely resulting from the State Board of Education's action to create more rigorous cut scores for achievement levels. Results for the new test of computer skills are also a concern. Analysis of student outcomes is provided at the grade level as well as for subgroups. This report describes demographic trends that impact our student outcomes as well as information about students retained in grade. Finally, the report provides summaries of several research and evaluation efforts related to effective practices for promoting student achievement.

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October 2006 Effective Practices for At-Risk Elementary and Middle School Students Baenen, Nancy
Gilewicz, Ed
Ives, Sarah
Lynn, Amy
Warren, Tom
Yaman, Kimberly

72 View Abstract

The students who have the most difficulty reaching accountability standards in Wake County Public Schools are those with more than one of the following characteristics: recipients of free or reduced-price lunch, students with disabilities, and/or students with limited English proficiency. The Evaluation and Research Department identified elementary and middle schools that differed in their effectiveness in promoting achievement growth for these students. Quantitative and qualitative analyses suggest differences in both attitudes and practices. The more effective schools had higher expectations for these students, and greater confidence in their ability to meet students' needs. Evidence suggested more effective administrative leadership/support, training, and utilization of resources. Higher-growth middle schools utilized assessments to inform instruction more frequently, and higher-growth elementary schools had more structured collaboration around student needs. Further research is planned.

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July 2006 High School Redesign 2004-05 Reichstetter, Rosemary

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The Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) strengthened the rigor, relevance, and relationships within its high schools in 2004-05; a primary strategy was the adoption on a block schedule. This progress report found an increase in more rigorous academic opportunities. Higher numbers of enrollees engaged in advanced courses and generally stable or higher academic success was achieved with End-of-Course exams, grade point averages, and credits earned. Greater relevance in coursework was evident and a wider variety of instructional practices. Staff promoted stronger student-staff relationships by emphasizing personalization. The majority of students and teachers reported fewer discipline concerns in classes, and students felt connected with their schools. Dropout and suspension rates did not decline.

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April 2006 Effective Biology Teaching: A Value-Added Instructional Improvement Analysis Model Haynie, Glenda

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This research study developed a value-added instructional improvement analysis model. North Carolina state testing results were used in regression and residual analyses of student achievement. This analysis allowed for identification of the "most effective" and "least effective" biology teachers in Wake County Public Schools (WCPSS). The study found that the "most effective" biology teachers were focused on the delivery of biology instruction; resisted distractions from their classroom efforts; maximized student use of class time; studied and planned with other teachers using the North Carolina Biology Standard Course of Study; focused all student time on the Standard Course of Study goals; carefully planned teacher controlled student activities; and used data to guide their instructional practice.

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March 2006 2004-05 Wake County Public Schools' Dropout Rate Gilleland, Kevin
McMillen, Brad

4 View Abstract

2004-05 Wake County Public Schools' Dropout Rate

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February 2006 Project Achieve Evaluation: Year Four, 2004-05 Baenen, Nancy
Carpenter, Megan
Dudley, Kristy

35 View Abstract

Project Achieve, a local instructional initiative used by Wake County Public School System (WCPSS), was adapted from a Brazosport, Texas model. The program grew from eight to 19 WCPSS schools over four years, and all 16 continuing schools had a higher percentage of students at or above grade level in spring 2005 than prior to the program. Fourth-year results were relatively positive. Nine of 19 (47%) participating schools met the state ABCs High Growth standard (including two of the new schools), compared to 40% of other WCPSS elementary and middle schools. Eleven of 19 schools (58%) -- compared to 35% of other WCPSS elementary and middle schools -- increased the percentage of students at or above grade level between spring of 2004 and spring 2005.

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December 2005 Advanced Placement (AP) Course-Taking, Exam Participation, and Exam Results, 2004-05 Dulaney, Chuck
McMillen, Brad

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The first section of this bulletin summarizes Advanced Placement (AP) course participation and AP exam data for the Wake County Public School System for the 2004-05 school year. Overall, the percentage of high school students who took at least one AP course increased from 14.1% in 2003-04 to 15.7% in 2004-05. About 59% of students who took an AP course took the corresponding AP exam for that course, and about 78% of those exam scores were 3 or higher, which is the College Board's threshold for mastery. The second section reports on a more in-depth study of AP results for students from the 2003-04 school year that looks at the relationship between 8th-grade achievement and success in AP courses.

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December 2005 End-of-Grade Multiple-Choice Test Results, 2004-05 McMillen, Brad

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The percentage of reading and mathematics tests taken by Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) students in grades 3-8 that resulted in Level III or IV scores fell slightly in 2004-05 to 90.8% from 91.1% in 2003-04. The percentage of students scoring in Level III or IV was slightly higher in mathematics (91.4%) than in reading (90.4%). The percentage of students scoring in Level III or IV in reading showed slight increases at all grade levels except grade 4, while percentages in mathematics rose slightly in grades 6 and 7 and fell in grades 3, 4, and 5. Female students out performed male students in both subjects. Disaggregation by race/ethnicity, income level, and disability status showed either no change or a small increase in the percentage of reading scores at Level III or IV and no change or a small decline in mathematics for most groups.

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December 2005 Graduation Rates of the 1998-99 9TH-Grade Cohort Wake County Public School System Dulaney, Chuck
Haynie, Glenda

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A study of 6,037 first-time Wake County Public Schools (WCPSS) 1998-99 9th-grade students found that their overall four-year graduation rate was 80% and a five-year graduation rate was 83%. Female students (87%) were more likely to graduate than male students (79%). Asian (92%) and White (88%) students were more likely to graduate than Black/African American (68%) and Hispanic/Latino (72%) students. Black/African American male students were least likely to graduate (60%). The 1998 rate is six percentage points higher than a comparable 1995 rate. All ethnic subgroups improved, with Hispanic/Latino students increasing four points, Black/African American students increasing eight points, and Asian students increasing nine points.

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December 2005 WCPSS Outcomes Summary for 2004-05, With an Emphasis on Achievement Gap Status Baenen, Nancy
Yaman, Kimberly

45 View Abstract

The Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) saw improved achievement between the late 1990s and 2003, both in overall trends and results disaggregated by subgroup. Achievement gaps began to close. The percentage of students scoring at grade level is now quite high. In the past three years, the percentage of lower income, minority, and limited-English-proficient students has increased, and the percentage of students at grade level has changed very little. Dropout and graduation rates show some closing of gaps between Black and White students, but not between Hispanic/Latino and White students. Identifying ways to further close achievement gaps and improve other student outcomes is challenging, especially in light of additional graduation requirements which will be added for students entering 9th grade in the 2006-07 school year.

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October 2005 Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Results: 2004-05 Dulaney, Chuck
Haynie, Glenda

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The Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) met 66 out of 73 (90.4%) measurabledistrict targets in the third year of federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) accountability standards. The 2004-05 school year was the first year that the Annual Measurable Objectivesincreased. In grades 3-8, the objectives were 76.7% proficiency in reading, up from 68.9%, and 81.0% in math, up from 74.6%. In 10th grade, the Annual Measurable Objectives were given new starting points based on past student performance on English I, 10th-grade Writing, and Algebra I tests, which were approved as the high school primary tests. In spite of the new and increased targets, 63% of all WCPSS schools made AYP in 2004-05 (83 out of 132). Twenty-seven schools missed only one or two targets. Students with disabilities and recipients of free or reduced-price meals (economically disadvantaged) were the two subgroups that most often failed to meet AYP targets.

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August 2005 ABC Outcomes for WCPSS for 2004-05 Dulaney, Chuck

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ABC Outcomes for WCPSS for 2004-05

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July 2005 Student Support Team Evaluation Baenen, Nancy
Harlow, Kristin2

66 View Abstract

Student Support Teams (SST) are designed to strengthen and support students who are experiencing academic, behavioral, family, and/or emotional difficulties that interfere with learning. SSTs develop and implement action plans using classroom-, school-, family-, and/or community-based strategies. In 2003-04, 80% of the 4,944 students served by SSTs were elementary students. Over half of the students referred for academic reasons scored on grade level before SST participation. Earlier SST meetings and family-based strategies were correlated with positive academic outcomes. Classroom-based strategies were correlated with fewer suspensions. Schools varied in their success in improving SST students' achievement. SST participants' growth in achievement was generally smaller than a matched comparison group over one year, but students could have differed in ways related to referral reasons. SST students closed the gap between their achievement and that of the district overall in some elementary grades but not at the secondary level.

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March 2005 Dropouts from Wake County Public Schools 2003-04 Gilleland, Kevin

57 View Abstract

Dropouts from Wake County Public Schools 2003-04

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March 2005 East Wake High School Evening Program Reichstetter, Rosemary

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The East Wake High School Evening Program study focused on whether the program was meeting its original intent and was cost/beneficial. The focus changed from serving only dropouts or students likely to drop out or not graduate who participated in the extended day program to serving any student needing course grade recovery. Most attempted courses were completed with credits earned, and grade promotions of enrollees increased. However, some classes were small, which increased the cost per student. Few dropouts enrolled in 2003-04, and overall enrollment was lower than previously.

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February 2005 Block Scheduling Evaluation Baenen, Nancy
Reichstetter, Rosemary

62 View Abstract

In 2003-04, 11 Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) high schools moved from a traditional student schedule of six full-year courses to a block schedule of four courses each semester (4x4). Implementation went fairly smoothly, with 90% of teachers trained prior to the change. Academic course opportunities and course enrollment numbers increased substantially (by 24% and 46% respectively) compared to 2002-03, key desired outcomes. Academic success was marked by increases in credits earned, grade promotion rates, and twelfth grade graduation rates as desired. Maintenance of prior status was desired for other outcomes this first year. End-of-course performance and grade point averages of 3.0 or higher actually increased slightly, while Advanced Placement (AP) scores of 3 and greater decreased slightly. Student attendance and suspension rates remained the same. Generally, most of those surveyed and interviewed expressed satisfaction with the change. Exploring modified schedule options for some courses as well as continued professional development are recommended.

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December 2004 Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Results: 2003-04 Dulaney, Chuck
Haynie, Glenda

16 View Abstract

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Results: 2003-04

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December 2004 Dropouts from Wake County Public Schools 2002-03 Gilleland, Kevin
Gilleland, Kevin
Gilleland, Kevin
Gilleland, Kevin

26 View Abstract

Dropouts from Wake County Public Schools 2002-03

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December 2004 Dropouts from Wake County Public Schools 2002-03 Gilleland, Kevin
Gilleland, Kevin
Gilleland, Kevin
Gilleland, Kevin

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Dropouts from Wake County Public Schools 2002-03

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December 2004 Dropouts from Wake County Public Schools 2002-03 Gilleland, Kevin
Gilleland, Kevin
Gilleland, Kevin
Gilleland, Kevin

26 View Abstract

Dropouts from Wake County Public Schools 2002-03

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December 2004 Dropouts from Wake County Public Schools 2002-03 Gilleland, Kevin
Gilleland, Kevin
Gilleland, Kevin
Gilleland, Kevin

26 View Abstract

Dropouts from Wake County Public Schools 2002-03

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October 2004 WCPSS Outcomes Summary for 2003-04, With an Emphasis on Achievement Gap Status Baenen, Nancy
Dulaney, Chuck
Yaman, Kimberly

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The Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) has seen positive changes in patterns of achievement and dropout rates over the past several years overall and by subgroup. The most positive one-year subgroup changes related to dropout rates for Black students and Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) for minority, low-income, and limited English proficient (LEP) students. However, many achievement gaps remain, and the system continues to work towards optimal achievement for all students and closing achievement gaps.

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January 2004 Dropouts from Wake County Public Schools 2001-02 Dulaney, Chuck
Gilleland, Kevin

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Dropouts from Wake County Public Schools 2001-02

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December 2003 A Study of the 1995 WCPSS 9TH - Grade Students with Disabilities Cohort Haynie, Glenda

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In a study of 5,226 first-time 1995 9th-grade students, 12% of the students were students with disabilities (SWD). Academic performance indicators for the SWD group were far below the overall cohort indicators. Difficulties for students with disabilities could be observed beginning in ninth grade. The average GPA of SWD students at the end of ninth grade was 1.79(a D+ average) compared to an average GPA of 2.58 (a C+ average) for the overall cohort. Just 57% of the SWD cohort graduated (defined as completion of 12th grade with a diploma or certificate) compared to 77% of the overall cohort. Of the graduating SWD students, only 36% took the SAT with an average total score of 949, while 76% of the overall cohort took the SAT with an average total score of 1065. Black SWD students were less likely to graduate than White SWD students (45% compared to 66%). Behaviorally/Emotionally Disabled (BED) Black female students were least likely to graduate (13%). The 43% of SWD students who dropped out had a ninth grade average GPA of 0.82 (below a D average).

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November 2003 Wake County Public School System Outcomes Summary for the 2002-03 School Year Baenen, Nancy
Dulaney, Chuck

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Overall, the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) has seen positive changes in patterns of achievement and dropout rates over the last several years. However, the system continues to work towards optimal achievement for all students, closing achievement gaps, and improving Annual Yearly Progress (AYP) results. Each of the sections that follow cites key findings from reports produced by the Evaluation and Research Department (E&R) during the 2002-03 school year or from reports currently in progress that will analyze student outcomes from 2002-03. Subsequent pages contain figures illustrating some of the key findings.

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June 2003 Promotion/Retention of Students In Grades K-8: 2001-02 Paeplow, Colleen

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At the end of the 2001-02 school year, 90.5% percent of students in grades K-8 were promoted, 3.6% were retained, and 5.9% withdrew from Wake County Public Schools. Of the 48,874 students in grades 3-8, 95% took at least one End-of-Grade (EOG) test. The retention rate was higher among students in grades 3-8 who did not take EOG tests (6.1%) than for students who took EOG tests (2.4%). The rate of retention for male students was consistently higher than that of female students. Students receiving free or reduced lunch, students with Limited English Proficiency status, and students with Special Education status had lower promotion rates and higher retention rates than their counterparts. Kindergarten (8%) and 1st-grade (7%) students had the highest rate of retention. One percent of White students were retained compared to 5% of Black and Hispanic/Latino students.

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May 2003 Graduation Rates, Wake County Public School System: A Study of the 1995 9TH-Grade Cohort Haynie, Glenda
Johnson, Stephen
Scudder, David

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A study of 5,226 first-time 1995 9th-grade students found their overall graduation rate was 77%. Female students (80%) were more likely to graduate than male students (69%). Asian (83%) and White (83%) were more likely to graduate than Black (60%) and Hispanic/Latino students (68%). Black males were least likely to graduate (53%).

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April 2003 Advanced Placement Exam Results 2001-2002 Regan, Roger

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Students at 15 Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) high schools took approximately 4,878 Advanced Placement exams offered by the College Board in 2001-02. With 20% of all juniors and seniors in the district taking at least one AP exam, the percent attaining a score of 3 or higher on a 5-point scale (the score typically needed to qualify for college course credit) reached a 10-year high of 80.5%, up 3.3 percentage points from the previous year. WCPSS' overall success rate was higher than that of comparable large school districts, and 17 percentage points higher than the rate for the nation as a whole. On the five most frequently taken AP exams, the percent of scores that were 3 or higher rose an average of 8.6 points.

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February 2003 NovaNET Student Outcomes 2001-2002 Baenen, Nancy
Harlow, Kristin2

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In the 2001-02 school year, NovaNET students earned significantly higher GPAs and fewer F's than before participating in NovaNET. NovaNET students did not show significantly greater gains than students in a comparison group that had similar demographic and academic characteristics; however, analyses revealed that the two groups varied somewhat in terms of prior suspensions, so results should be interpreted with caution. Some schools had much greater participation and student success than others. Strategies used by successful NovaNET programs include individualizing coursework; supplemental counseling and behavior modification; selecting the most appropriate students; requiring students to sign a contract promising to complete the course; and giving offline assignments to supplement NovaNET. Extending successful school practices to all schools could increase overall program impact.

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June 2002 Advanced Placement Exam Results 2000-2001 Kaase, Kristopher
Paeplow, Colleen

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The Advanced Placement (AP) program offers college-level courses to high school students. Many colleges and universities provide course credit to students who earn a high score on the end-of-year exams. Almost 60% of United States high schools offer AP course work, and more than 800,000 high school students participated in AP programs during the 2000-2001 school year (College Board, 2001). All 15 comprehensive high schools in the WCPSS offer AP courses. Enrollment in Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) AP courses was approximately 6,900 in 2000-01. Many students took more than one AP course. A total of 4,320 AP examinations were taken by 2,223 WCPSS students at the end of the school year. This report examines AP exam results for the WCPSS with comparisons to other large school systems, the state of North Carolina, the South, and the United States.

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April 2002 Annual Progress Report on Students who Drop Out 2000-2001 Gilleland, Kevin
Kaase, Kristopher

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The overall dropout rate continued to decline in 2000-01 for the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS). The grades 7-12 dropout rate was 2.4 percent, the lowest since the state of North Carolina and the WCPSS began reporting dropouts in 1992, using federal standards. Since 1994-95 the gap between the grades 7-12 dropout rates for Black students and White students has decreased from 4.3 to 2.1 percentage points. The largest number of dropouts has always occurred at the high school level. Of the 1,038 dropouts in the WCPSS for 2000-01, 1,024 (98.7%) were in grades 9-12. The WCPSS high school dropout rate decreased from 5.5% in 1995-96 to 3.7% in 2000-01 (see Figure 1). The WCPSS high school dropout has been lower than the rate for North Carolina and paralleled the trend of a decreasing rate of dropouts since the state began reporting high school dropout rates in 1998-99.

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February 2002 NovaNET 2000-2001: Analyses of Student Outcomes Relative to a Comparison Group Baenen, Nancy
Harlow, Kristin2

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NovaNET is an on-line computerized instructional system that provides students with self-paced instruction for many North Carolina high school courses. This evaluation looks at outcomes for students participating in the NovaNET program and compares them with outcomes for a group of students with similar characteristics who did not participate in NovaNET. The primary positive finding was that the number of failing grades decreased significantly for students who participated in NovaNET, while a slight increase occurred for matched students. The GPA for NovaNET students showed a significant increase, but the comparison group increased about the same amount (difference between increases were not significant). NovaNET appeared to have more of a positive impact on math and social studies course grades than on English and science course grades. The pass rate for NovaNET science courses was only 50%. NovaNET did not appear to impact suspensions in 2000-2001; rates for NovaNET and matched students were statistically similar. NovaNET students were more likely to drop out of school in 2000-2001 than the comparison students who had a lower dropout rate than WCPSS overall; the change in drop-out rates should be examined again over the next few years. Overall, NovaNET seems to help students pass classes. However, more specific findings are difficult to obtain due to the newness of the program, and the difficulty of creating an accurately matched comparison group.

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January 2002 Promotion/Retention of Students in Grades K-8 2000-2001 Kaase, Kristopher

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Promotion/Retention of Students in Grades K-8 2000-2001

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January 2002 Summer Academy in the Wake County Public Schools: An Evaluation of the 2001 Program Holdzkom, David

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Summer Academy in the Wake County Public Schools: An Evaluation of the 2001 Program

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May 2001 2000-2001 Iowa Test of Basic Skills Tyler, Doris

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2000-2001 Iowa Test of Basic Skills

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February 2001 Annual Progress Report on Students who Drop Out 1999-2000 Baenen, Nancy
Carwile, Stephanie
Kitts, Doris
Knott, Donna
Scudder, David

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The high school dropout rate during 1999-2000 in the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) was 4.1 percent (2.7% for grades 7-12), the lowest since the start of annual reporting by WCPSS. The WCPSS dropout rate has steadily declined from 1994 to 2000, as displayed in Figure 1. The decline was interrupted in the 1998-1999 school year, the year that students going directly to junior or community college GED programs began to be included as dropouts. The decline resumed during the 1999-2000 school year. The decrease in the WCPSS dropout rate corresponded to a similar decrease in dropouts reported across the state.

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February 2000 Dropout Report 1998-1999 Gilleland, Kevin
Howard, Daniel

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The 1998-99 duplicated dropout rate is the percent of first-time dropouts (those who dropped out for the first time in 1998-99) and previous year dropouts (those who dropped out before 1998-99, returned to school in 1998-99, and dropped out again). There had been a steady decline in the WCPSS dropout rate for grades 7-12 from 1993-94 to 1997-98. However, the percentage of WCPSS dropouts increased between 1997-98 and 1998-99. The WCPSS dropout increase also corresponded to a dramatic increase in dropouts reported across the state. (Figure 1). These increases may be due to a rule change in the assessment of dropout rates which now reports students who transfer to community colleges to receive their GED as dropouts. In the past, these students were referred to as transfers.

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February 2000 Impact of Instructional Assistance 1998-99: Accountability Report Baenen, Nancy

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WCPSS has had efforts in place to support low achieving students for many years. However, about 20% of WCPSS students do not score high enough to be considered "on grade level" on the End-Of-Grade (EOG) tests given across North Carolina in grades 3-8. WCPSS and the community have adopted the goal that 95% of our students will score on grade level in grades 3 and 8 by 2003. Staff recognized that the 95% achievement goal could not be accomplished unless we tried new ways to help low achieving students and provided additional resources to schools. For the 1998-99 school year, previously funded efforts such as special education, Title I, English as a Second Language, and Student Support Teams continued, but approximately $5 million in additional funds (some grant and some local) were also allocated to schools to support low achieving students. This report focuses on whether the additional funds made a difference in the progress of low achieving students and what techniques seemed to make the most positive difference for students.

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July 1999 Collected Evaluations on the WCPSS Alternative School Program for Students with Long-Term Suspensions Carruthers, Bill

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The Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) has provided an alternative school program for students with long-term (LT) suspensions since the 1995-96 year. In 1995-96, the program was operated by the WCPSS and known as the Alternative Learning Center (ALC). Since the 1996-97 year, the WCPSS has contracted with the Richard M. Milburn High School (RHMS), a private firm, to operate the program. Over these years, the WCPSS has conducted a number of evaluations of the program. This Executive Summary highlights major conclusions of these collected evaluations.

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March 1999 The Impact of Poverty Upon Schools Banks, Karen

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The Impact of Poverty Upon Schools

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