WCPSS Logo

Tag: Literature review

Your search found 33 reports. Refine your search.

If you need assistance finding a specific report, please contact wcpss-data-accountability@wcpss.net.

Published Document Title Authors Pages Abstract
October 2021 A Brief Look at Early School Start Times Scrimgeour, Meghan

13 View Abstract

This literature review is intended to provide an overview of the current research literature on the effects of early secondary school start times on student outcomes and to help inform decisions regarding options for future Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) start times. Even though research shows that getting sufficient sleep is critical for all students, sleep deprivation is prevalent among American adolescents. Early school start times are one of the primary hurdles secondary students face to getting enough sleep. As states and districts across the country deliberate adjusting school start times, current research suggests that pushing back secondary school start times (i.e., starting later) is an effective counter measure to combat sleep deprivation and to positively impact students’ sleep patterns, physical and mental health, safety, and academic outcomes.

Full Report (PDF)

May 2013 A Snapshot of After-School Program Research Literature Rhea, Anisa

8 View Abstract

A wide range of after-school programs have become available to students in grades K-12 over the past 15 years. Programs are generally grouped within those meeting needs related to academic performance (such as improved school attendance, grades, and achievement scores), social/emotional development, and prevention/behavioral outcomes. High quality studies have identified key components of the most effective after-school programs. Programs best support effective outcomes when they are directed by a clear vision, yet flexible to the changing needs of participants; managed by high quality staff who maintain an adult to student ratio between 1:10 and 1:16, and operate for a sufficient length of time (at least 45 hours). Active and consistent student participation in the program is also necessary to reap the full benefits. Additionally, partnerships with schools, families, and the community strengthen after-school programs. Depending on the type of program and how costs are measured, the annual cost can range between $450 and $7,000 per child.

Full Report (PDF)

July 2011 Title I Preschool Program in the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS): Short- and Long-Term Outcomes Baenen, Nancy

22 View Abstract

The longitudinal study of the 2005-06 preschool in WCPSS found short-term gains during the preschool year, but limited impact by kindergarten and no average impact by the end of 3rd grade on achievement, retention rates, special education placements, or attendance. Small sample sizes limit conclusions that can be drawn; a larger study with a stronger research design is recommended for next year. The larger 2010-11 preschool program provided strong evidence of short-term gains on achievement after the preschool experience. Teachers and parents were generally satisfied with the program. Teachers suggested higher student attendance and greater parent involvement would be helpful. Teachers used Creative Curriculum materials with varying frequency; they also viewed some components of the curriculum as more effective than others.

Full Report (PDF)

April 2011 Assessing the Value of the Arts: Looking Beyond Traditional Achievement Measures Baenen, Nancy
Brasfield, Jon

13 View Abstract

Courses in the arts develop skills specific to the discipline. Research also suggests that the arts contribute to enhanced attentiveness, engagement in school, communication skills, and critical and divergent thinking. Other studies point out benefits for at-risk students in reducing negative outcomes such as dropout and crime rates. Studies report a correlational relationship between arts education and reading achievement, but a causal link has not been established. Thus, there is evidence of benefits of the arts that can support students' success in school, but more high quality causal studies are needed.

Full Report (PDF)

November 2010 WCPSS Professional Learning Teams (PLTs): 2009-10 School-Based Policy Implementation Study Baenen, Nancy

122 View Abstract

As a result of Board Policy 3610, PLTs were implemented across WCPSS in a consistent fashion in 2009-10. Data show that implementation improved and teachers spent more time engaged in collaborative work. School staff cited numerous benefits for teachers and students. Regression analyses showed a reasonably strong correlation between high levels of PLT implementation and students' academic achievement, attendance, and their overall level of satisfaction with their schools. Essential characteristics of PLTs were illustrated in case studies of high-performing PLTs' in the district. While collaborative cultures have been well-established, most teams could benefit from additional training on ways to use data, and on ways to evaluate the success of their efforts. Communications with school communities could also be more consistent across schools.

Full Report (PDF)

June 2010 Evaluation of Central Services Professional Learning Teams as of Spring 2010 Baenen, Nancy
Jackl, Andrew

35 View Abstract

The Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) board policy states that central services staff are to support school implementation of Professional Learning Teams (PLTs) and to participate in PLTs at the central level. Central staff support school efforts in a variety of ways, and over 85% of principals at each level reported this support was adequate. Participation in PLTs among central staff respondents was high for those in administrative (86%) and professional and technical roles (76%), but lower for support staff (37%). High percentages of central administrators, professionals, and technical staff had positive views about PLT implementation and impact. Responses for those in administrative roles were almost always more positive in spring 2010 than in previous surveys. High percentages of administrators and professional/technical staff believe PLTs help them perform their job more effectively, along with most support staff (91%, 86%, and 67% respectively).

Full Report (PDF)

April 2010 Your Child and the Kindergarten Initial Assessment Baenen, Nancy

2 View Abstract

Describes the Kindergarten Initial Assessment which all students are given as they enter kindergarten to assess their beginning skills. Also describes the kinds of skills that are helpful for students to have in kindergarten.

Full Report (PDF)

June 2009 PLC Survey Results by Years of Experience Baenen, Nancy

13 View Abstract

On the High Five PLC Survey, most teachers, regardless of years of experience, viewed PLCs as having a positive impact on their work environment and student learning. Beginning teachers tended to have the highest percentage of agreement. The percentage of teachers agreeing that PLCs were having the desired impact increased between 2007-08 and 2008-09 for both beginning teachers and those with more experience. Thus, trends were in the desired direction.

Full Report (PDF)

January 2009 Best Practices to Promote High School Graduation Baenen, Nancy

13 View Abstract

Significant attention and resources have been focused on reforming high schools to enhance graduation rates. The research literature supports the following practices: For struggling students, accurate identification and intensive instructional, monitoring, and counseling support For 9th graders, transition activities, personalization, and academic support strategies For teachers, intensive training to help them provide effective instruction and support, particularly for students showing signs of risk.

Full Report (PDF)

January 2009 Overview of Practices to Promote High School Graduation Baenen, Nancy

2 View Abstract

Significant attention and resources have been focused on reforming high schools to enhance graduation rates. The research literature supports the following practices: For struggling students, accurate identification and intensive instructional, monitoring, and counseling support For 9th graders, transition activities, personalization, and academic support strategies For teachers, intensive training to help them provide effective instruction and support, particularly for students showing signs of risk.

Full Report (PDF)

October 2008 Helping High-Performing Students Achieve at Higher Levels: A Review of the Literature Yaman, Kimberly

11 View Abstract

Helping High-Performing Students Achieve at Higher Levels: A Review of the Literature

Full Report (PDF)

October 2008 Wake County Public School System K-5 Assessment Results 2007-08 Districtwide Summary Jackl, Andrew

21 View Abstract

In 2007-08, WCPSS K-5 assessment results were similar to past years. Some changes were implemented in the writing assessment methods. The percentage of students demonstrating proficiency was 85% for book level standards and 72% for reading strands. Mathematics mastery was 69% of students. Writing results for strands was 52%, content rubric was 69%, and conventions rubric was 57%. Differences by subject likely reflect differences in standards for the assessments. NCLB subgroup analyses revealed gaps between ethnic groups and groups with and without risk factors. Between 2006-07 and 2007-08, notable improvements were evident for Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, and Limited English Proficient populations, helping to close the achievement gaps slightly.

Full Report (PDF)

May 2008 WCPSS Professional Learning Communities: 2007-08 Implementation Status Reichstetter, Rosemary

62 View Abstract

Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) are in the implementation stages throughout the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS). Results from the 2007-08 High Five PLC Survey of teachers throughout the school system, as well as observations and focus group interviews in selected schools, show that strong support continues for PLC implementation overall, (66% to 87% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed with statements about each PLC element). Results suggest PLC concepts and work efforts are well underway and are growing in implementation. Challenges cited include finding time for PLC team work and remediation of student skills, increasing the understanding of all staff of PLC concepts, and increasing teachers' skills in developing and using quality formative assessments.

Full Report (PDF)

April 2008 Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID): WCPSS Program Evaluation Baenen, Nancy
Lougée, Aimee

57 View Abstract

This evaluation examined the implementation and effectiveness of the AVID program in middle schools throughout the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS). Survey results and school visits revealed considerable inconsistencies in implementation across schools. Specifically, selection criteria were not consistently understood and applied, all staff members implementing the program were not able to attend AVID training, and some schools emphasized enrollment in Algebra I in eighth grade more than others as a desired outcome of AVID participation. Attrition from the program was high, with 38% of those enrolled in grade 6 in 2005-06 continuing with the program through grade 8 in 2007-08. The stated goal of having all AVID students enroll in Algebra I by grade 8 was not met, although a higher percentage of AVID students in grade 8 enrolled in Algebra I than was true system wide (50% vs. 28%).

Full Report (PDF)

April 2008 Facts for Families No.2 Your Child and the Kindergarten Initial Assessment Baenen, Nancy

2 View Abstract

Describes the Kindergarten Initial Assessment which all students are given as they enter kindergarten to assess their beginning skills. Also describes the kinds of skills that are helpful for students to have in kindergarten.

Full Report (PDF)

February 2008 Helping Improve Achievement for Students with Multiple Academic Risk Factors Baenen, Nancy

2 View Abstract

See abstracts document

Full Report (PDF)

January 2008 Facts for Families No.1 What Research Suggests to Help Your Student Achieve Baenen, Nancy

2 View Abstract

See abstracts document

Full Report (PDF)

August 2007 WCPSS Students with Multiple Academic Risks: Achievement Patterns and School Experiences Baenen, Nancy
Ives, Sarah
Paeplow, Colleen
Reichstetter, Rosemary

112 View Abstract

This study focused on effective practices for students with multiple academic risk factors (students with disabilities, students eligible for free or reduced price lunch, and/or students with limited English proficiency). Achievement performance patterns over several years differ between students making stronger and weaker achievement growth on End-of-Grade tests. Sixteen case studies of 5th and 8th graders revealed that students with positive achievement patterns were more likely to show signs of resilience in their personal characteristics, school experiences, and/or home support than were students with negative achievement patterns. Teachers of both groups used some methods recommended in national research (such as small-group work, structure, and collaboration). A specific focus on language development was not mentioned. Homework was a common problem.

Full Report (PDF)

June 2007 Effective Practices for Elementary School Students with Multiple Needs Baenen, Nancy

4 View Abstract

Document summarizes a larger study about elementary school-level practices that can make a difference in promoting the achievement growth of multiple-risk students: high expectations, positive attitudes about being able to meet students' needs with the resources available, supportive administrative leadership that allocates resources effectively, professional training, formal and information collaboration to help students, and more frequent use of teacher-led instruction.

Full Report (PDF)

June 2007 Effective Practices for Middle School Students with Multiple Needs Baenen, Nancy

4 View Abstract

School-level practices can make a difference in promoting the achievement growth of multiple-risk students. At the middle school level, effective school staffs were more likely to; focus more on how to address student needs and less on barriers to addressing needs; have more informal administrator visits in classrooms; have more positive attitudes and training in working with at-risk groups, and more frequently use resources such as assessment data, extra adults in classrooms, technology, and instructional pacing guides.

Full Report (PDF)

October 2006 Defining a Professional Learning Community: A Literature Review Reichstetter, Rosemary

4 View Abstract

Summarizing a nonexhaustive review of the literature, the following definition is suggested for a professional learning community: A professional learning community is made up of team members who regularly collaborate toward continued improvement in meeting learner needs through a shared curricular-focused vision. Facilitating this effort are: supportive leadership and structural conditions, collective challenging, questioning, and reflecting on team-designed lessons and instructional practices/experiences, and team decisions on essential learning outcomes and intervention/enrichment activities based on results of common formative student assessments.

Full Report (PDF)

July 2006 High School Redesign 2004-05 Reichstetter, Rosemary

51 View Abstract

The Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) strengthened the rigor, relevance, and relationships within its high schools in 2004-05; a primary strategy was the adoption on a block schedule. This progress report found an increase in more rigorous academic opportunities. Higher numbers of enrollees engaged in advanced courses and generally stable or higher academic success was achieved with End-of-Course exams, grade point averages, and credits earned. Greater relevance in coursework was evident and a wider variety of instructional practices. Staff promoted stronger student-staff relationships by emphasizing personalization. The majority of students and teachers reported fewer discipline concerns in classes, and students felt connected with their schools. Dropout and suspension rates did not decline.

Full Report (PDF)

May 2006 Predictive Assessment of Reading (PAR) and Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) K-2 Literacy Program 2004-05 Paeplow, Colleen

29 View Abstract

This evaluation examined 1,524 students in grade 1 at 13 Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) schools that participated in the Predictive Assessment of Reading (PAR) study in 2004-05. It also examined their participation in the Accelerated Learning Program K-2 Literacy Program during 2004-05. Both literacy initiatives focused on identifying students in need of additional assistance and providing support to those students. Student success was measured by the PAR assessment and WCPSS instructional book levels. The PAR assessment was used to determine the benefit of PAR only and PAR plus ALP K-2, the correlation of the two instruments, and whether PAR and ALP K-2 identified the same students as at-risk. Although the experimental and control groups saw similar results overall, students who participated in the ALP K-2 program saw greater gains among the experimental group. While PAR participants showed substantial improvement on the PAR assessment, ALP K-2 participants showed similar gains on book level with or without full PAR support. There was a significant positive relationship between students' performance on the PAR assessment and book level and a substantial overlap in the students identified as at-risk of failure by both programs.

Full Report (PDF)

February 2006 Project Achieve Evaluation: Year Four, 2004-05 Baenen, Nancy
Carpenter, Megan
Dudley, Kristy

35 View Abstract

Project Achieve, a local instructional initiative used by Wake County Public School System (WCPSS), was adapted from a Brazosport, Texas model. The program grew from eight to 19 WCPSS schools over four years, and all 16 continuing schools had a higher percentage of students at or above grade level in spring 2005 than prior to the program. Fourth-year results were relatively positive. Nine of 19 (47%) participating schools met the state ABCs High Growth standard (including two of the new schools), compared to 40% of other WCPSS elementary and middle schools. Eleven of 19 schools (58%) -- compared to 35% of other WCPSS elementary and middle schools -- increased the percentage of students at or above grade level between spring of 2004 and spring 2005.

Full Report (PDF)

February 2005 Block Scheduling Evaluation Baenen, Nancy
Reichstetter, Rosemary

62 View Abstract

In 2003-04, 11 Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) high schools moved from a traditional student schedule of six full-year courses to a block schedule of four courses each semester (4x4). Implementation went fairly smoothly, with 90% of teachers trained prior to the change. Academic course opportunities and course enrollment numbers increased substantially (by 24% and 46% respectively) compared to 2002-03, key desired outcomes. Academic success was marked by increases in credits earned, grade promotion rates, and twelfth grade graduation rates as desired. Maintenance of prior status was desired for other outcomes this first year. End-of-course performance and grade point averages of 3.0 or higher actually increased slightly, while Advanced Placement (AP) scores of 3 and greater decreased slightly. Student attendance and suspension rates remained the same. Generally, most of those surveyed and interviewed expressed satisfaction with the change. Exploring modified schedule options for some courses as well as continued professional development are recommended.

Full Report (PDF)

April 2004 From Complacency to Excellence Through School District Reform: A Case Study of the WCPSS Banks, Karen

52 View Abstract

WCPSS has made some notable positive changes in achievement, graduation, and other outcomes over the last few years. This document summarizes trends over time in outcomes and district efforts which likely contributed.

Full Report (PDF)

April 2004 Project Achieve: Adapting the Brazosport Model to a Large LEA Baenen, Nancy
Speas, Carol

18 View Abstract

Project Achieve is a major Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) instructional initiative to improve student achievement adapted from a Brazosport, Texas model. The number of schools involved increased from 8 to 13 in 2002-03. Results were positive. All Project Achieve elementary and middle schools met the state ABCs High Growth standard both years (up from five in spring 2001), and nearly all schools increased the percent of students at or above grade level in their first year. In Year 2, compared to other WCPSS students, participation in Project Achieve was generally associated with significantly higher gains in mathematics and similar gains in reading (when background characteristics were controlled through regression analyses). Staff members also expressed more positive opinions about the academic program in their schools than in the past.

Full Report (PDF)

January 2004 Project Achieve Evaluation: Year Two, 2002-03 Speas, Carol

38 View Abstract

Project Achieve is a major Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) instructional initiative to improve student achievement adapted from a Brazosport, Texas model. The number of schools involved increased from 8 to 13 in 2002-03. Results were generally positive. All Project Achieve elementary and middle schools met the state ABCs High Growth standard in spring 2003 (up from five in spring 2001), and 10 of 13 schools increased the percent of students at or above grade level. Compared to other WCPSS students, participation in Project Achieve was generally associated with significantly higher gains in mathematics and similar gains in reading (when background characteristics were controlled through regression analyses). Staff members also expressed more positive opinions about the academic program in their schools than in the past.

Full Report (PDF)

May 2003 Safe Schools/Healthy Students Grant Year 4 Mid-Year Performance Report Project Status October 1, 2002 - April 30, 2003 Baenen, Nancy
Harlow, Kristin2

6 View Abstract

The Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) is currently in the extension year, or Year 4, of the Safe Schools/Healthy Students grant. This report outlines the activities continued in the extension year, and a status report on each activity for the first part of Year 4.

Full Report (PDF)

February 2003 Project Achieve Evaluation Report: Year One, 2001-2002 Speas, Carol

71 View Abstract

This is an evaluation of the pilot year of Project Achieve, a major local instructional initiative at six elementary schools and two middle schools to help reach the WCPSS goal of 95% of students at or above grade level. Participating schools had a higher percentage of low-income students and low-achieving students and slightly less stable student populations than the district as a whole. The initiative is based on the same principles and instructional process applied in the Brazosport, Texas school district, with modifications tailored to local needs and based on the NC Standard Course of Study. Project training and development did occur as planned from early 2001 to implementation in the 2001-02 school year. Participating schools did exceed ABCs growth and performance standards of the previous (baseline) year, as evidenced by annual NC ABCs Accountability System reports. Additionally, parents and staff expressed more positive opinions about the academic program in participating schools.

Full Report (PDF)

February 2003 Title VI: Annual Evaluation Report 2001-2002 Overbay, Amy
Speas, Carol

25 View Abstract

In the 2001-02 school year, Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) implemented a project within an innovative assistance program area of Title VI- the provision of performing arts teachers within magnet elementary schools to provide arts education - under the "promising educational reform projects" category. Twelve arts teachers, representing between 0.3 and 1.0 FTE each, served in six elementary magnet schools: Fuller, Powell, Washington, Wendell, Conn, and Wiley. Also, in spring 2001, funding was allocated for planning and training activities for a new school improvement/reorganization effort at eight schools. WPSS Instructional Services Division identified a set of six schools showing historical patterns of below-expectation growth, and two schools volunteered to participate in "Project Achieve." Training and development for the eight schools did occur as planned in July - October, 2001. Results are shared.

Full Report (PDF)

November 2002 Literature Review: Technology Use and Its Relevance to Academic Achievement Reichstetter, Rosemary

10 View Abstract

Does the use of technology positively relate to academic achievement? A review of the literature identified 66 articles on this topic. Twenty-three articles were studied for this report. Depending upon the focus of the article, a positive relationship was found in most cases while no relationship was found in a small number of cases reviewed. In reviewing all papers, articles, and studies, a number of other factors were identified as important considerations.

Full Report (PDF)

December 2000 Class-Size Reduction Evaluation 1999-2000 Scudder, David

7 View Abstract

Small classes have always had an intuitive appeal for parents. To many, it seems obvious that smaller classes should be associated with greater achievement. Still, all other things remaining equal, small classes are more expensive than large classes. Recent research suggests that smaller classes actually do significantly improve achievement. This report examines these and other important issues as they relate to the first year of the federal Class-Size Reduction Program (CSRP) in the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS)

Full Report (PDF)