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Tag: Program evaluations

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Published Document Title Authors Pages Abstract
April 2019 Elementary Support Model Implementation and Outcomes: 2014-15 to 2017-18 Boykin, Anne-Sylvie
Paeplow, Colleen
Scrimgeour, Meghan
Singh, Malkeet

28 View Abstract

The Elementary Support Model (ESM) was implemented in Wake County Public School System’s (WCPSS) 12 lowest performing elementary schools. ESM is designed to improve teacher and student outcomes by addressing governance, staffing, professional development, resources, calendar and schedule, and provides leadership and instructional coaching. Qualitative methods were used to assess implementation and a quasi-experimental design was utilized to examine ESM’s intermediate and long-term outcomes. The implementation of ESM in WCPSS was strong. ESM was also successful in meeting, or mostly meeting, its short-term goals related to professional development, coaching, and governance. Results related to intermediate and long-term goals were mixed. Three areas of strength were principal support to teachers, reduction of beginning teachers, and increases in the number of ESM schools meeting EVAAS growth; however, additional goals related to student outcomes were either only partially met or not met. Recommendations focus on strengthening implementation and continuing to monitor progress toward reaching program goals.

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January 2019 Multi-Tiered System of Support, 2016-17 to 2017-18 Bulgakov-Cooke, Dina
Singh, Malkeet

32 View Abstract

The Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS) framework, which uses a systems approach to promote school improvement and support all students in improving academics and behavior using data-based problem-solving, is a key part of the Wake County Public Schools System (WCPSS) Strategic Plan. As of 2017-18, MTSS schools were at the initial stages of MTSS implementation and showed no significant improvement in Grades 3 and 8 reading proficiency, overall achievement, or Education Value-Added Assessment System (EVAAS) growth ratings that could be attributed to MTSS implementation. Suspension rates and eligibility for special education in high incidence categories were not yet a focus for the practices or professional learning and were also not positively affected by MTSS. However, a higher percentage of teachers in treatment than control elementary schools reported that MTSS positively affected student achievement in their schools. Additionally, MTSS had a positive effect on Hispanic/Latino students’ 2017-18 graduation rates and on reduction of their special education eligibility rates at elementary schools. The initial results suggest that MTSS should remain a district priority with an ongoing leadership support, expanded focus on tiered supports and on the behavioral component of MTSS.

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October 2017 Academically Gifted Co-Teaching in the Wake County Public School System: Implementation, Perceptions and Achievement Lenard, Matthew
Townsend, Megan

26 View Abstract

Following the recommendations of a 2013 instructional audit, the Academically or Intellectually Gifted department implemented a co-teaching instructional strategy in 41 volunteer schools starting in the 2014-15 school year. Implementation data and discussions with central office staff suggest that while implementation fidelity was relatively strong in the first year, it declined in 2015-16. Still, the first year of implementation offered evidence to guide any future co-teaching implementation. First, the “one teach, one assist” method of co-teaching was most frequently observed, suggesting that co-teachers may have defaulted to one of the less optimal instructional strategies under the model. Second, AIG teachers and co-teachers perceived the initiative similarly but differed on a few particularly meaningful survey items pertaining to the perceptions and role of the specialist. Third, AIG students and non-AIG students in co-taught classrooms were similarly engaged. Finally, students in co-taught classrooms significantly outperformed their non-co-taught peers in science, but not in math or reading.

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June 2017 Math Acceleration in WCPSS Elementary and Middle Schools: Implementation and Impact Lenard, Matthew

23 View Abstract

Since 2014, the Wake County Public School System has implemented single subject acceleration (SSA) as a way to provide students with access to advanced mathematics courses. This report includes three main findings related to the implementation and impact of SSA. First, a disproportionally large percentage of male, Asian and academically/intellectually gifted students were nominated, qualified and accelerated compared with their female, Black and Hispanic/Latino counterparts. Second, roughly two-thirds of students who qualified for SSA in mathematics actually proceeded to take the accelerated course. Third, near the qualifying cutoff score, accelerated students performed similarly to their non-accelerated counterparts, suggesting that SSA had no significant achievement effects—positive or negative—for students who were accelerated. We recommend that staff expand the visibility of SSA in order to inform more diverse populations, identify potential causes of non-acceleration among qualifiers, explore options for assessing content-level mastery, and maintain the 80% qualifying CASE score for SSA mathematics.

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May 2017 Teacher Leader Corps (TLC) Final Report: 2013-14 through 2015-16 Baenen, Nancy
Simmons, Brandon

89 View Abstract

The Teacher Leaders Corps had many strengths and was fairly successful in reaching its implementation and short-term goals. Central training quality was considered strong and attendance rates were high (especially in Years 1 and 2). Of those who began the TLC work in 2013-14, approximately 60% participated all three years. At the school level, about half of the intended dissemination events took place. Professional learning sessions emphasized use of various digital resources. Discovery Education resources were available to all schools and provided evidence that online resources were utilized by teachers and students. DE utilization was higher in Year 1 than in Year 2 or 3; and teachers utilized DE more than students. Decreased use of DE after Year 1 could reflect less interest or an increase in digital resources available to schools. TLC members utilized technology appropriately and in a variety of ways based on classroom observations. The school team model utilized in TLC provided a better opportunity for sustaining the effort than training sessions with no follow-up. Ways to further increase the likelihood of implementation, impact, and sustainability in schools include putting structures in place at the central and school level to facilitate and monitor teacher implementation and to provide more coaching for teachers.

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April 2017 Building Bridges in High School and Beyond: The Impacts of Apex High School's Academy of Information Technology Lenard, Matthew
Paeplow, Colleen

23 View Abstract

Apex High School’s Academy of Information Technology (AOIT), launched in 2001, is one of the nation’s most highly regarded career academies. Despite its strong reputation, we know very little about the impact of AOIT on student outcomes. To measure these causal impacts, we leveraged the fact that AOIT has admitted students through a lottery, which creates “treatment” and “control” groups that are similar and have outcomes that we can compare. Results show that gaining admittance to AOIT and subsequently enrolling increases high school graduation and college enrollment rates by about 8 percentage points, with the attainment gains concentrated among male students. We also found that academy participation reduced 9th grade absences and participation in the concentrated curriculum did not reduce the likelihood of taking Advanced Placement (AP) courses or performance on the AP exams.

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April 2017 Communities in Schools Graduation Coaches in WCPSS, 2015-16 Baenen, Nancy
Rhea, Anisa

32 View Abstract

This is the third and final of a series of evaluation reports the Data, Research, and Accountability (DRA) Department has conducted on the Communities In Schools (CIS) Graduation Coach program within the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS). In 2015-16, Graduation Coaches served approximately 600 students across eight WCPSS elementary, middle, and high schools. Of these program participants, 62% met the selection criteria for attendance, behavior, and/or academic areas of need which were established by WCPSS and CIS Wake staff for students. Students were most often served for academic reasons. Within all areas, students who met the selection criteria were more likely to meet the corresponding goals compared to students who did not meet the criteria. However, results also show that program students who met the selection criteria had similar outcomes to students who also met the selection criteria yet were not served by Graduation Coaches. Thus, effectiveness of the program’s services was not evident. The program is funded by the district at $350,000 annually. Should WCPSS continue this program, DRA offers the following recommendations: 1) broaden the behavior selection criteria and serve students who meet the attendance, behavior, and/or academic criteria; 2) provide services that are more intensive and directly related to students’ needs; and 3) improve the tracking of service-delivery data.

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April 2017 Effective Teaching Framework (ETF): 2015-16 Baenen, Nancy
Jackl, Andrew
Regan, Roger

30 View Abstract

The Effective Teaching Framework (ETF) initiative was designed to provide a common language and lens for understanding the skills, strategies, and resources needed for teachers and school leaders to create an optimal learning environment for all students. ETF training consisted of six full days of training for principals, assistant principals (APs), and selected Central Services staff, as well as an abridged version (24 hours) for Instructional Resource Teachers (IRTs). Beginning and mentor teachers also received some training. Training was provided to all cohorts as planned. Generally, the training sessions were well-attended and highly-rated by the participants; in 2015-16, 92.7% agreed it helped them become more effective in their roles. The trainings were supplemented by an ETF website that provided a wide range of online resources. However, the website was underutilized, with only 26.3% of teachers indicating that they used the website to improve their teaching. In most cases, implementation of ETF was limited to individuals applying their learning to classroom observations and teacher evaluations. Based on focus group interviews with APs, barriers to school-wide ETF efforts included: a) confusion about expectations for orchestrating an ETF “rollout” at their schools, b) lack of communication and follow-up from Central Services staff, c) leadership changes, d) lack of communal training and planning time among the schools’ administrative teams, and e) lack of grassroots support for the initiative at the school level. While training quality was high, building stronger buy-in before implementation, communicating clearer expectations, and implementing structures to support long-lasting roll-outs at the school level are recommended.

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September 2016 Playworks in the Wake County Public School System, 2014-15 and 2015-16 Adams, Elizabeth
Bulgakov-Cooke, Dina
Rhea, Anisa

41 View Abstract

This quasi-experimental study used multiple data sources to examine Playworks implementation and outcomes across two school years (2014-15 and 2015-16) at six WCPSS elementary schools. Differences in outcomes between Playworks and matched-comparison schools were examined. Similar to other national studies (Beeker et al., 2012; Fortson et al., 2013), the findings of impact are mixed. Coaches implemented program elements with fidelity, yet WCPSS encountered coach turnover as well as inconsistent teacher training and lower engagement with students at recess than desired. Significant differences found in the recess structures and activities between Playworks and traditional schools did not translate into positive impacts on student behavior or school climate. Prior to adopting new initiatives, WCPSS should consider the following: 1) carefully matching initiatives with root causes of school needs and funding sources; and 2) increasing the completeness and consistency of behavioral data collection when reducing students’ negative behavior is an expected outcome. Improvements in both areas could strengthen the likelihood of impact and the ability to measure that impact.

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April 2016 The Impact of Achieve3000 on Elementary Literacy Outcomes: Randomized Control Trial Evidence, 2013-14 to 2014-15 Hill, Darryl
Lenard, Matthew

28 View Abstract

In 2013-14, the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) launched Achieve3000 as a randomized controlled trial in 16 elementary schools. Achieve3000 is an early literacy program that differentiates non-fiction reading passages based on individual students’ Lexile scores. Two-year results show that Achieve3000 did not have a significant impact on student outcomes. However, both intent-to-treat and treatment-on-treated estimates show that in 2015, the second year of implementation, students in the treatment group outperformed their control-group counterparts by 0.13 standard deviation units (SD) on the year-end Achieve3000 LevelSet Lexile test. This effect size is consistent with mean empirical effect sizes reported by Lipsey et al. (2012). Yet in neither the pooled nor annual results did Achieve3000 significantly impact student performance on additional Lexile outcomes (EOG or DIBELS ORF). Both implementation and impact results for Achieve3000 suggest that the ability of this particular technology-based literacy solution to improve student performance beyond that of a control group fell short of vendor-defined and empirical expectations.

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February 2016 Teacher Incentive Fund Program at Wilburn Elementary School, Final Evaluation Baenen, Nancy
Germuth, Amy

40 View Abstract

Wilburn implemented the Teacher Advancement Program (TAP) from 2008-09 through 2014-15. TIF funding supported the performance pay component since 2010-11. All TAP principles were implemented. However, challenges occurred related to staff turnover, scheduling, and the extra work involved. Many teachers did not find the TAP model very helpful. The TAP rubric and model lessons (with coaching) were considered the most positive aspects. Relative to the comparison schools, the pattern of K-2 literacy results was mixed for 2013-14 and somewhat stronger in 2014-15. Wilburn also showed similar patterns for the percentage of students scoring proficient on the EOG from 2007-08 (before TAP) to 2011-12 and 2012-13 to 2014-15 (with the revised EOG). Wilburn’s growth results on EVAAS were at or above state expectations each year except for grade 4 in both subjects in 2015. Results were similar to comparison schools (with somewhat stronger results in 5th grade math). Overall, Wilburn achievement results have not been consistently stronger with TAP compared to similar schools without TAP. The cost/benefit of the model was not clearly favorable.

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May 2015 Letterland Evaluation: 2013-14 Paeplow, Colleen

49 View Abstract

In 2013-14, Letterland had strong implementation, with moderate to high fidelity within approximately 90% of WCPSS K-1 classrooms. The impact of Letterland on students’ reading achievement was neutral to positive. A significantly higher percentage of WCPSS kindergarten students were at or above benchmark mid-year on Phoneme Segmentation Fluency (PSF) and Nonsense Word Fluency-Correct Letter Sounds (NWF-CLS) than matched students from a comparison school district. WCPSS students’ scores remained significantly higher on the end-of-year NWF-CLS. Participation in Letterland had a significant positive effect for limited English proficient (LEP), Asian, Black, and Hispanic /Latino kindergarten students varying by indicator and benchmark period. The percentage of kindergarten students with an end-of-year PSF score at or above benchmark increased 8.2 percentage points from 2011-12 to 2013-14. Results for NWF-CLS were inconsistent across years. Results suggest Letterland is a promising approach and should be continued.

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May 2013 Formative Assessment with Technology 2011-12: Second Year of Implementation Bulgakov-Cooke, Dina
Talbot, Troy

30 View Abstract

The second year (2011-12) of the Formative Assessment with Technology Project in three WCPSS schools was studied to determine the fidelity of implementation of the formative assessment practices and the project's impact on student achievement. Classroom observations and surveys of teachers and students showed that implementation was moderate, and it varied widely across teachers. Certain targeted practices were reported or observed much more often than others. High turnover in the teachers participating in the project likely contributed to the uneven implementation. High school staff had the highest level of implementation of training concepts as well as the highest use of the electronic response tools for assessment. Full implementation and impact on state achievement test scores was expected to take two years to be evident. Since only nine teachers participated and had data for two years, impact could not be reliably assessed. This pilot training model would be too expensive to roll out district-wide in WCPSS. More cost effective models may be used to encourage appropriate use of formative assessment.

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May 2013 High Five PLT Survey Results, 2007-08 to 2012-13 Jackl, Andrew

20 View Abstract

WCPSS PLT survey responses have been positive over time, remaining at high levels for the past six school years. Analyses of High Five PLT Survey data from 2007-08 to 2012-13 show: The percentage of positive agreement to each of the High Five PLT Survey themes increased between 4 and 11 percentage points since baseline data was first collected in the 2007-08 school year. When the survey data were disaggregated by the six PLT themes, only "collaborative culture/team processes" showed a decline (two percentage points). When the survey items are examined individually, the percentage of respondents marking that they "strongly agree" almost universally decreased from 2011-12, while the percentage marking "agree" showed a corresponding increase. Administering the High Five PLT Survey at less frequent intervals is recommended, as well as standardized PLT training for all new staff.

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March 2013 Evaluation of the Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF) Program: Wilburn Elementary School, Year 2 2011-12 Baenen, Nancy

30 View Abstract

Wilburn was in its fourth year of implementing Teacher Advancement Program (TAP) in 2011-12, which is designed to attract, retain, and motivate quality teachers and increase student achievement. It was in the second year of TIF funding to provide performance pay for improved student performance. Analysis of EOG reading and math test scores for 2011-12 showed increases in student performance (where different cohorts of students are compared over time) and growth (when a student is compared to him- or herself over time). All staff earned some performance pay based on the TAP model formulas (unlike the previous year). Recommendations are to provide more ways for teachers to share their perceptions of TAP, to start observations earlier in the year, and to improve training by focusing on the application of the rubric and differentiating training (for teachers new to TAP and those with experience).

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January 2013 2011-12 District Improvement Initiatives Evaluation Bulgakov-Cooke, Dina

85 View Abstract

Seven District Improvement initiatives were implemented in 2011-12 in WCPSS. All were well designed and coordinated, with common goal setting processes and use of common monitoring tools. All initiatives either met or partially met 2011-12 goals. Some were more successful in showing student outcomes, with the most positive initiatives being elementary mathematics and adolescent literacy. These results should be used to influence future decisions about continuation or strengthening of these efforts. New components that were well received and implemented by those trained (but which did not have achievement results as yet) should also be considered for future funding.

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July 2012 High Five PLT Survey Results, 2007-12 Jackl, Andrew

20 View Abstract

Summary - WCPSS PLT survey responses have been positive over time, reaching a high plateau for the last three years. Analyses of High Five PLT Survey data from 2007-12 show: In 2011-12, high percentages (87.2%) of WCPSS teachers responding to the High Five PLT Survey provided positive responses to the items. Responses have been positive from 2007-08 to 2011-12, with small increases over time. Overall, WCPSS has shown an improvement in its PLT Performance Index of 5.7 percentage points over five years. The elementary, middle, and high schools have shown gains of 4.2, 7.5, and 9.1 percentage points, respectively. The implementation of dedicated time for PLT work (Wake Wednesdays) correlated to slight increases in PLT indices at the elementary and middle school levels; only the elementary level saw a slight decline when dedicated time was no longer provided.

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April 2012 Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) Professional Learning Teams (PLTs): 2010-11 to 2011-12 School-Based Policy Study Jackl, Andrew
Lougée, Aimee

38 View Abstract

Professional Learning Teams were first introduced in WCPSS in 2003. Implementation checks, first done in 2007-08, showed most teachers (81.5%) reported involvement in PLT work. These high percentages improved slowly over time, with 87% positive responses to items by fall of 2011. In terms of impact, 81% of teachers indicated students learned more because of their PLT work. Student retention rates, classroom grades, state test performance, and graduation rates have all improved over time. Regression analyses indicated those schools who utilized PLTs the most had greater decreases in student retention rates than those with lower implementation. Similar analyses for student growth on test results just missed statistical significance. While it is difficult to separate out the impact of PLT work from other initiatives, these analyses suggest PLTs have contributed to improvements in WCPSS outcomes despite tough economic times and increasing challenges for teachers.

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December 2011 District Improvement Outcomes: 2010-11 Paeplow, Colleen

38 View Abstract

In 2010-11, Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) was in district-wide improvement as a result of failing to meet Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) in mathematics at the district level for the second consecutive year. This report examines overall student outcomes in 2010-11 as well as overall teacher outcomes and longitudinal results for schools targeted for three consecutive years of SIOP® training and support compared to matched schools who were not involved. SIOP® schools had a greater increase in students reaching growth targets than in the district overall. Increases in reading and mathematics proficiency at SIOP® elementary schools and reading at SIOP® middle schools were similar or slightly higher than for WCPSS. Overall mathematics results were not positive for SIOP® middle schools; however, matched school analysis by subject and school level found targeted student subgroups (i.e., Hispanic/Latino and Black/African American, Limited English Proficient, and economically disadvantaged) did benefit from attending SIOP® targeted schools. 2010-11 represented the first year of implementation of the Secondary Literacy and Secondary Mathematics Initiatives. The demographic similarity of schools implementing Secondary Mathematics with WCPSS coupled with the weak results indicates, as with Secondary Literacy, the results of this initiative could be strengthened by more selective process of targeting schools to receive training.

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December 2011 WCPSS District Improvement Implementation 2010-11 Baenen, Nancy
Bulgakov-Cooke, Dina

94 View Abstract

Instructional strategies aimed at improving achievement of low performing student subgroups in need of support were selected by the District Improvement Advisory Committee, so that WCPSS could exit District Improvement status. Impact of each initiative, which often included teacher training and coaching is examined in this implementation report. Recommendations are made including setting strategic goals and systematically monitoring implementation; targeting schools or teachers with high numbers of AYP groups of students in need of support; being intentional in coaching efforts and structuring coaching models based on the SIOP® experience; building ownership and commitment at the school level; and coordinating new and existing efforts to optimize effectiveness.

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August 2011 Evaluation of WCPSS Central Services Professional Learning Teams (PLTs): Spring 2011 Jackl, Andrew

39 View Abstract

The Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) Board policy indicates that central staff are to support school implementation of Professional Learning Teams (PLTs) and to participate in PLTs at the central level. Central Services supported PLT work in the schools in a variety of ways. The percentage of principals who saw this support as adequate dropped from 85% to 70% between spring 2010 and 2011. Within Central Services, 86% of survey respondents reported participating in at least one PLT. Of those responding to the Spring 2011 PLT survey, responses remained overwhelming positive about implementation and effectiveness. However, without exception, the strength of agreement decreased, with the percentage of respondents who "strongly agreed" dropping between 2010 and 2011.

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July 2011 Teacher Advancement Program (TAP) at Wilburn Elementary School: Year 3 Evaluation Report Baenen, Nancy

21 View Abstract

The Teacher Advancement Program (TAP) is a model for training, teacher advancement, and instructional strategies. Based on interviews and observations, the four TAP principles were implemented with fidelity during the 2010-11 school year, with one exception--teacher evaluations. Feedback was slow, and teachers had concerns about the reliability of the ratings. The impact on teachers was negative. Compared to 2009-10, reading and math proficiency improved in grades 3 and 5 in 2010-11 but not grade 4. However, compared to proficiency before TAP began, only Grade 5 had improved reading proficiency and none of the grades (3, 4, and 5) had higher proficiency in math. Grade 4 had positive trends for Academic Change (growth) in both reading and math.

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July 2011 Title I Preschool Program in the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS): Short- and Long-Term Outcomes Baenen, Nancy

22 View Abstract

The longitudinal study of the 2005-06 preschool in WCPSS found short-term gains during the preschool year, but limited impact by kindergarten and no average impact by the end of 3rd grade on achievement, retention rates, special education placements, or attendance. Small sample sizes limit conclusions that can be drawn; a larger study with a stronger research design is recommended for next year. The larger 2010-11 preschool program provided strong evidence of short-term gains on achievement after the preschool experience. Teachers and parents were generally satisfied with the program. Teachers suggested higher student attendance and greater parent involvement would be helpful. Teachers used Creative Curriculum materials with varying frequency; they also viewed some components of the curriculum as more effective than others.

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June 2011 Outcomes for Supplemental Education Services (SES): 2009-10 Paeplow, Colleen

37 View Abstract

This report, the third of three reports examining Supplemental Education Services (SES) within the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS), focused on the long-term goal of improved student achievement by the end of the school year. In 2009-10, 508 students participated in SES at the five schools offering SES: Brentwood, Fox Road, Poe, Wendell, and York. The vast majority of students (83%) participating in SES received tutoring services in both reading and mathematics. Overall, this study did not support the value of SES in promoting higher achievement (beyond what matched students achieved).

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April 2011 WCPSS 2010-11 High Five Professional Learning Teams (PLT) Survey Results: Implementation Over Time Jackl, Andrew

36 View Abstract

The Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) continues to implement Professional Learning Teams (PLTs) as a research-based method of improving teacher effectiveness and increasing student achievement. Over each of the last four years, a survey of educators was conducted in WCPSS and the other four High Five districts. As in previous years, this year's data showed strong support among teachers for the PLT model; between 73% and 91% of respondents indicating that they "strongly agree" or "agree" with the statements pertaining to the six PLT themes. Viewed longitudinally, positive responses for each theme have increased between four and eight percentage points since 2007-08. When 2010-11 results were compared with 2009-10, the results were less dramatic, with smaller changes in the percentage of positive responses.

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March 2011 Implementation of Supplemental Education Services: 2009-10 Paeplow, Colleen

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This report, the second of three reports examining Supplemental Education Services (SES) within WCPSS, focused on the implementation of SES, and the degree to which short-term and intermediate goals were met. In 2009-10, the SES program was largely implemented with fidelity, with some areas needing refinement related to communication and monitoring. Monitoring reports noted appropriate instruction based on learning plans was occurring. SES has 13 implementation requirements for the Local Educational Agency (7), providers (2), and parents (4). Nine were fully met, with four partially met. The two short-term goals--student enrollment in SES and providers pre-assess all participants--were met. Three of the six intermediate goals were met (progress reports given to parents, minimum of 30 hours offered to each student, monitoring showed implementation occurring) and two additional goals were partially met (attendance at SES and post-assessments given to completers).

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February 2011 Supplemental Education Services: 2008-09 & 2009-10 Paeplow, Colleen

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This report describes SES within Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) in terms of the schools, providers, and student participants in 2008-09 and 2009-10. It is the first in a series of three reports related to SES. NCLB requires schools receiving Title I funding in their second year of school improvement to offer eligible students Supplemental Educational Services (SES) in addition to existing Title I services. The SES programs for WCPSS in 2008-09 and 2009-10 were in compliance with federal guidelines to make available an SES program, enroll only FRL students, and to use state-approved vendors to deliver the program. SES is designed to improve the achievement of FRL students who score below, at, or above grade level. Therefore, service to some students may help schools reach AYP standards while service to others may help individual students and schools reach ABCs and other standards of academic success.

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January 2011 Academy of Reading® (AoR) 2008-09 and 2009-10 Evaluation Baenen, Nancy
Lougée, Aimee

68 View Abstract

Academy of READING (AoR) is designed to improve students' foundational reading skills; it is used in almost all Wake County Public Schools (WCPSS) secondary schools. Central staff recommended students with prior End of Grade/Course (EOG/EOC) scale scores placing them high in Level II or low in Level III have first priority for service; many students served scored below this range (second priority). Program completion rates increased from 2008-09 (26%) to 2009-10 (41%), but were still considerably lower than desired (100%). Growth for 2009-10 AoR participants on End of Grade reading/English tests was strong (with the percentage of students reaching their growth targets increasing from 37.5% before service to 60.1% afterwards). This improvement is educationally important. Program completion gave students only a slight advantage in terms of EOG growth. The program appeared to be helpful, with patterns generally favoring middle school over high school students.

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December 2010 Foundations of Algebra: 2009-10 Paeplow, Colleen

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This report examined the implementation of Foundations of Algebra, a course designed to provide high school students with low mathematics performance an extra opportunity to review and study foundational mathematics concepts prior to enrolling in Introductory Mathematics and subsequently Algebra I. In the fall of 2009, 877 high school students participated in Foundations of Algebra while another 774 students were enrolled directly into Introductory Mathematics in the spring of 2010. 1,600 students enrolled in Introductory Mathematics in 2008-09 were used as a comparison group. Eighty-two percent of Foundations of Algebra students were Level I or II; however, less than two-thirds of students (63%) scored Level I or low Level II--the program's criteria. Twenty-seven percent of students enrolled directly into Introductory Mathematics met the recommended criteria of high Level II scores. A higher percentage of students who participated in Foundations of Algebra enrolled in Algebra I and Algebra I Part I than did comparison students.

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November 2010 Year 3 Magnet Schools Assistance Program Annual Progress Report Brasfield, Jon
Cárdenas, Virginia

76 View Abstract

The three MSAP schools; East Garner International Baccalaureate Magnet Middle School (EGMMS), Garner International Baccalaureate Magnet High School (GMHS), and Southeast Raleigh Leadership and Technology Magnet High School (SRMHS) showed progress on MSAP performance measures during the 3rd year of the grant. Data on 16 performance measures collected relate to "Desegregation and Choice" (6), "Building Capacity" (2), and "Academic Achievement of Students" (8). Overall, half the targets were met, with the most variability across schools for the Desegregation and Choice measures. Observations and survey results revealed increased efforts to implement innovative educational methods and programs at all three MSAP schools. Each school established strategic processes to address targets in each goal area. Although progress was made, much work remained to be done to achieve the original goals of the MSAP grant. The district requested and received a no-cost extension to run through the 2010-2011 school year.

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September 2010 WCPSS District Improvement: 2009-10 Implementation Status Bulgakov-Cooke, Dina

46 View Abstract

In 2009-10 Wake County Public Schools System (WCPSS) exited District Improvement in reading and remained in level one for mathematics. All District Improvement efforts gained momentum. The Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP®) continued as the primary focus to meet the needs of limited English proficient (LEP) students in elementary and middle schools. The high school component was modified and addressed both literacy and mathematics. The number of trained SIOP® teachers considerably increased (from 588 in 2008-09 to 956 in 2009-10), follow-up coaching to support application of training reached more teachers, training implementation and buy-in strengthened. All SIOP® training, coaching, and implementation objectives for in 2009-10 were met or partially met. The number and use of SIOP® modified focus lessons increased substantially, but awareness could still be improved.

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June 2010 Middle School Mathematics: 2006-07 to 2008-09 Paeplow, Colleen

38 View Abstract

In 2006-07, seven Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) middle schools piloted Algebraic Thinking as an alternate approach to teaching middle school mathematics. Algebraic Thinking was developed to help students in grade 6 reach higher mathematics courses by combining the regular and advanced middle school mathematics courses into one heterogeneously grouped class and differentiating instruction. Of the 1,493 grade 6 students enrolled in one of the five pilot schools, 1,087 were still enrolled in Algebraic Thinking in 2008-09 and were therefore included in the study. A comparison cohort of 1,078 grade 6 students enrolled from 2006-07 to 2008-09 was selected from five matched schools. While both cohorts of students improved academically, overall findings suggest that participation in Algebraic Thinking did not have a greater positive impact on students' mathematics achievement as measured by EOG proficiency or growth. However, a significantly higher percentage of Algebra I students at the Algebraic Thinking schools met their Algebra I growth target.

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May 2010 WCPSS 2009-10 High Five PLT Survey Results: Professional Learning Team (PLT) Implementation Over Time Jackl, Andrew

40 View Abstract

The Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) continues to implement Professional Learning Teams (PLTs) as a research-based method of improving teacher effectiveness and increasing student achievement. High Five PLT Survey results from 2007-08 through 2009-10 showed a strong level of support for the PLT oncept. The 2009-10 results revealed 73% to 92% of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed with all statements pertaining to each of the six core PLT themes. Generally, teachers responded more positively to the survey items in 2009-10 than in previous years. The percentage of teachers meeting weekly for over an hour increased greatly over prior years after implementation of the Board policy on PLTs. In short, survey results suggest strong implementation, with slow but measureable progress towards full functioning of all components of the model.

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January 2010 NovaNET 2008-09 Evaluation Bulgakov-Cooke, Dina

29 View Abstract

NovaNET is a technology-based teacher-facilitated educational approach used at schools to support students at risk of not meeting graduation requirements to accrue credits in a variety of subjects. NovaNET contributes to the WCPSS goal of closing achievement gaps and creating opportunities for all students to graduate on time. In 2008-09, 38 NovaNET courses were offered districtwide. All high schools offered credit recovery (CR) courses. Six schools offered remediation opportunities, and 11 offered new credits. Based on summer courses, NovaNET had a high success rate in helping students earn credits towards graduation. Based on high summer pass rates, it is recommended to encourage use of NovaNET to earn course credits, examine ways to enhance EOC performance, designate use of NovaNET within course codes, streamline reporting methods, and enhance monitoring of success. Consider expanded use of NovaNET as a supplement for regular courses. Based on cost-effectiveness, expand student access to NovaNET in summer if feasible.

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October 2009 Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) Grades 3-5: Evaluation 2007-08 Baenen, Nancy
Lougée, Aimee

34 View Abstract

ALP 2007-08 was designed to primarily support Level I and II student below grade levels, with others supported as funds allowed. Evidence indicates many students scoring proficient were served (especially in literacy) while some students scoring below grade level received no documented support. ALP reached less than half of students scoring below grade level in literacy and in mathematics. Literacy achievement growth outcomes for Level I-II students below grade level were about the same as for other Level I-II students (many of whom received other services); ALP results were less positive for students who scored at grade level prior to service than for similar students. Mathematics proficiency results were less positive than for those served in other programs or not served. Achievement outcomes were similar for students served during the school day or outside of the school day.

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October 2009 Intervention Months Grades 6-8: Elective Results 2008-09 Paeplow, Colleen

26 View Abstract

North Carolina Student Accountability Standards require targeted intervention be provided to students who fail to meet statewide accountability standards. Intervention Months of employment were allotted to middle schools to help them provide intervention to students who are struggling academically. In 2008-09, Intervention Months 6-8 allotted Wake County Public School System's (WCPSS) 32 middle schools 762 months of employment to be used along with other resources to provide targeted supplementary assistance to students requiring academic intervention beyond that provided in the regular classroom. In 2008-09, 3,155 students participated in an intervention elective. Findings suggest that participation in an intervention elective did not have a positive impact on reading achievement as measured by EOG proficiency or growth. The percentage of intervention elective participants at or above grade level increased more for mathematics than reading. A statistically significant higher percentage of students who participated in a mathematics intervention only made growth than did academically similar students not enrolled in the intervention elective.

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October 2009 Year 2 Magnet Schools Assistance Program (MSAP) Brasfield, Jon

56 View Abstract

In Year 2 of the MSAP grant, significant progress was made by each school and its community to implement the grant objectives. Year 2 represented an amalgamation of Year 1 activities that were not implemented due to a delay in hiring key personnel, original objectives assigned to Year 2, and several activities that arose from improvement sessions. Each school had a blue print that captured their performance measures, target outcomes, yearly activities, staff development activities, and resources along with a customized yearly time line. The 16 performance measures were grouped into three categories. The "Desegregation and Choice" category was the most difficult for schools to attain (with three or four of the six measures met by each school). All schools achieved both "Building Capacity" performance measures. In the "Academic Achievement" category, SRMHS achieved 5/8 targets, GMHS achieved 4/8, and EGMMS achieved 6/7 (4-year graduation rate is measured for the two high schools, but not for the middle school). In all, SRMHS achieved the stated target on 10/16 performance measures, GMHS on 10/16, and EGMMS met 12/15.

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June 2009 Algebra I Performance in Year-Long versus Semester-Long Courses Holdzkom, David

5 View Abstract

This study examined differences in student achievement between 9th grade students who took Algebra I in a twopart, year-long sequence and those who took a one-semester Algebra I course. Results indicated higher proficiency rates and higher growth results for students in the year-long sequence, especially for students who scored below Achievement Level IV on their 8th Grade Mathematics EOG test. Schools are urged to use these results to make data-based scheduling decisions for 9th grade Algebra I students.

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June 2009 Helping Hands Results 2007-08: Grades 3-8 Paeplow, Colleen

18 View Abstract

In 2007-08, Wake County Public School System's (WCPSS) Helping Hands program served 419 students. Helping Hands is a mentoring program that targets Black/African American male students enrolled in grades 3-8 who are academically marginal. Results are based on the 385 students in grades 3-8 with available data. The mission of the Helping Hands program is to provide services to African-American male students to promote personal development and academic achievement. Helping Hands has academic, behavioral, and attendance goals. Overall, findings suggest that Helping Hands did not have a positive impact on academic success as measured by EOG proficiency or growth. However, Helping Hands did appeared to have a positive impact on suspension trends and excessive absences (10 or more days) relative to Black/African American male students.

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May 2009 Professional Learning Community (PLC) Implementation: WCPSS 2008-09 High Five PLC Survey Results Jackl, Andrew

37 View Abstract

The Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) continues to implement Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) as a research-based method of increasing student achievement and improving teaching effectiveness. Teachers were surveyed in 2007-08 and again in 2008-09 to obtain data about the status of PLC implementation efforts within the district. The 2008-09 results showed a strong level of support for the PLC concept (71% to 89% of the survey respondents agreed or strongly agreed with statements pertaining to each of the six core PLC themes). In most instances, teachers responded more positively to the survey items in 2008-09 than they did the year before. In short, survey results suggest that the district is making progress towards its goal of full PLC implementation.

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May 2009 Wake County Public School System Promotion and Retention in Grades K-12, 2007-08 Paeplow, Colleen

6 View Abstract

Within the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS), nearly all (96%) students in grades K-12 were promoted, with 4% retained at the end of the 2007-08 school year. Although the percentage of students retained is low, it represents 5,699 students who will require added instruction. For elementary and middle school students, retention requires a full year of additional instruction at an annual cost of $7,821 per student; for high school students it requires repeating courses at a somewhat lower cost. For each of the past three years more than 90% of students in all No Child Left Behind subgroups (ethnicity, free or reduced-price lunch, limited English proficient students, and students with disabilities) in WCPSS were promoted, but retention rates varied by subgroup. Although the overall retention rate in WCPSS was 4.3%, the percentage of tudents in each subgroup retained varied from 2% to more than 9% in 2007-08.

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March 2009 Comparison of SAS© EVAAS© Results and WCPSS Effectiveness Index Results Holdzkom, David
McMillen, Brad

15 View Abstract

Comparison of SAS© EVAAS© Results and WCPSS Effectiveness Index Results

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February 2009 North Carolina Virtual Public School in WCPSS Update for Fall 2007, Spring 2008, and Summer 2008 Baenen, Nancy
Bulgakov-Cooke, Dina

33 View Abstract

North Carolina Virtual Public School (NCVPS) has changed since summer 2007, with more traditional courses and fewer credit-recovery courses. Total NCVPS initial enrollments of Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) students were much lower in Fall 2007 (139), Spring 2008 (198), and Summer 2008 (430) than in Summer 2007 (1,378). Students were more likely to complete courses after Summer 2007. However, students enrolled in Fall 2007 and Spring 2008 were more likely to drop courses with failure after the deadline than to do so before the cutoff date. Percentages of final enrollments with passing NCVPS course grades increased from 47% in Summer 2007 to 64%, 84%, and 70% in the fall, spring, and summer, respectively. In Summer 2008, pass rates for EOC courses were somewhat lower than for other courses, with relatively low pass rates on EOC tests.

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April 2008 Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID): WCPSS Program Evaluation Baenen, Nancy
Lougée, Aimee

57 View Abstract

This evaluation examined the implementation and effectiveness of the AVID program in middle schools throughout the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS). Survey results and school visits revealed considerable inconsistencies in implementation across schools. Specifically, selection criteria were not consistently understood and applied, all staff members implementing the program were not able to attend AVID training, and some schools emphasized enrollment in Algebra I in eighth grade more than others as a desired outcome of AVID participation. Attrition from the program was high, with 38% of those enrolled in grade 6 in 2005-06 continuing with the program through grade 8 in 2007-08. The stated goal of having all AVID students enroll in Algebra I by grade 8 was not met, although a higher percentage of AVID students in grade 8 enrolled in Algebra I than was true system wide (50% vs. 28%).

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February 2008 Public Issues Confronting the WCPSS Board of Education as Perceived by Focus Group Interview Participants Baenen, Nancy
Holdzkom, David

6 View Abstract

In an effort to understand the issues that the citizens of Wake County believe confront the Board of Education, two focus group interviews were conducted in November 2007 with the Community Relations Committee (CRC). The two groups both identified population growth as a major root cause of many of the issues confronting the school system. Many of the issues identified by the interviewed groups may be thought of as nested, or embedded. The focus group interviews identified three major impacts of this rapid growth on the school district: providing high quality facilities and educational programs, creating a student assignment plan that is fair and provides some measure of predictability, and coping with the increasing diversity of the student population.

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October 2006 Evaluation of Supplemental Educational Services at Hodge Road Elementary 2005-06 Paeplow, Colleen

16 View Abstract

In 2005-06, four private agencies provided 252 Hodge Road students with supplemental educational services as one component of the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Only students receiving free or reduced-price lunch (FRL) were eligible. More than half of those served scored at or above grade level before service, while some students who scored below grade level were not eligible. The curricular materials used were remedial and not designed to extend the learning of students scoring at grade level. At grades 1-2, the percentage of students reaching grade level in literacy increased for those served; this was not the case for not-served students. Both served and not served students improved End-of-Grade (EOG) reading performance at grades 3-5. Students who had multiple risk factors (limited English proficient [LEP] or students with disabilities [SWD] in addition to FRL) showed the greatest increases in the percentage of students at grade level. A major caution when interpreting the results is that analyses could not control for other intervention efforts that may have contributed to results found.

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May 2006 Predictive Assessment of Reading (PAR) and Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) K-2 Literacy Program 2004-05 Paeplow, Colleen

29 View Abstract

This evaluation examined 1,524 students in grade 1 at 13 Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) schools that participated in the Predictive Assessment of Reading (PAR) study in 2004-05. It also examined their participation in the Accelerated Learning Program K-2 Literacy Program during 2004-05. Both literacy initiatives focused on identifying students in need of additional assistance and providing support to those students. Student success was measured by the PAR assessment and WCPSS instructional book levels. The PAR assessment was used to determine the benefit of PAR only and PAR plus ALP K-2, the correlation of the two instruments, and whether PAR and ALP K-2 identified the same students as at-risk. Although the experimental and control groups saw similar results overall, students who participated in the ALP K-2 program saw greater gains among the experimental group. While PAR participants showed substantial improvement on the PAR assessment, ALP K-2 participants showed similar gains on book level with or without full PAR support. There was a significant positive relationship between students' performance on the PAR assessment and book level and a substantial overlap in the students identified as at-risk of failure by both programs.

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April 2006 Effective Biology Teaching: A Value-Added Instructional Improvement Analysis Model Haynie, Glenda

17 View Abstract

This research study developed a value-added instructional improvement analysis model. North Carolina state testing results were used in regression and residual analyses of student achievement. This analysis allowed for identification of the "most effective" and "least effective" biology teachers in Wake County Public Schools (WCPSS). The study found that the "most effective" biology teachers were focused on the delivery of biology instruction; resisted distractions from their classroom efforts; maximized student use of class time; studied and planned with other teachers using the North Carolina Biology Standard Course of Study; focused all student time on the Standard Course of Study goals; carefully planned teacher controlled student activities; and used data to guide their instructional practice.

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March 2006 Partnership For Educational Success Status Report 2004-05 Baenen, Nancy
Rhea, Anisa

42 View Abstract

Initiated in 2001-02, the Partnership for Educational Success (PES) is a collaboration between the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) and Wake County Human Services (WCHS) designed to help at-risk students achieve grade-level performance. In 2004-05, 51 schools chose to participate in PES. A total of 545 students (including 285 referred students and 260 siblings) from 275 families were served. Kindergarten through 2nd-grade students composed the largest percentage of students served in 2004-05, and only small numbers of preschool and high school students were served. Students referred to PES did not always meet academic eligibility criteria of performing below benchmarks or grade-level standards. Although analyses of K-2 assessment data and End-of-Grade (EOG) exams show some gains in achievement, an overall positive impact of PES was not identified. In 2004-05, students' growth over one year was at predicted levels compared to similar students in WCPSS. About half of teachers reported that PES was effective in supporting student success.

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February 2006 Project Achieve Evaluation: Year Four, 2004-05 Baenen, Nancy
Carpenter, Megan
Dudley, Kristy

35 View Abstract

Project Achieve, a local instructional initiative used by Wake County Public School System (WCPSS), was adapted from a Brazosport, Texas model. The program grew from eight to 19 WCPSS schools over four years, and all 16 continuing schools had a higher percentage of students at or above grade level in spring 2005 than prior to the program. Fourth-year results were relatively positive. Nine of 19 (47%) participating schools met the state ABCs High Growth standard (including two of the new schools), compared to 40% of other WCPSS elementary and middle schools. Eleven of 19 schools (58%) -- compared to 35% of other WCPSS elementary and middle schools -- increased the percentage of students at or above grade level between spring of 2004 and spring 2005.

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December 2005 Advanced Placement (AP) Course-Taking, Exam Participation, and Exam Results, 2004-05 Dulaney, Chuck
McMillen, Brad

28 View Abstract

The first section of this bulletin summarizes Advanced Placement (AP) course participation and AP exam data for the Wake County Public School System for the 2004-05 school year. Overall, the percentage of high school students who took at least one AP course increased from 14.1% in 2003-04 to 15.7% in 2004-05. About 59% of students who took an AP course took the corresponding AP exam for that course, and about 78% of those exam scores were 3 or higher, which is the College Board's threshold for mastery. The second section reports on a more in-depth study of AP results for students from the 2003-04 school year that looks at the relationship between 8th-grade achievement and success in AP courses.

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October 2005 Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Results: 2004-05 Dulaney, Chuck
Haynie, Glenda

12 View Abstract

The Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) met 66 out of 73 (90.4%) measurabledistrict targets in the third year of federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) accountability standards. The 2004-05 school year was the first year that the Annual Measurable Objectivesincreased. In grades 3-8, the objectives were 76.7% proficiency in reading, up from 68.9%, and 81.0% in math, up from 74.6%. In 10th grade, the Annual Measurable Objectives were given new starting points based on past student performance on English I, 10th-grade Writing, and Algebra I tests, which were approved as the high school primary tests. In spite of the new and increased targets, 63% of all WCPSS schools made AYP in 2004-05 (83 out of 132). Twenty-seven schools missed only one or two targets. Students with disabilities and recipients of free or reduced-price meals (economically disadvantaged) were the two subgroups that most often failed to meet AYP targets.

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February 2005 Early Start Evaluation: Summer 2004 Paeplow, Colleen

23 View Abstract

Early Start, a pilot preschool program, offered three weeks of literacy and social skills preparation to pre-enrolled kindergarten students who have limited to no preschool experience. The percentage of participants mastering the six assessed concepts of print jumped from 5% to 52%. Entering students mastered an average of three out of six concepts of print and finished averaging five out of six. Student progress was also measured using 10 literacy and personal/social items from the Kindergarten Initial Assessment (KIA). Increases in overall proficiency were minimal due to a high number of students entering the program already proficient on the assessed items. Closer examination of these items using a four-part rubric did reveal improvements toward greater proficiency. However, participants scored similarly to demographically matched nonparticipants on the full KIA administered upon entry into kindergarten. Thus, overall results indicate growth for targeted skills. However, this growth was not sufficient to influence overall performance on the KIA.

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December 2004 Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Results: 2003-04 Dulaney, Chuck
Haynie, Glenda

16 View Abstract

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Results: 2003-04

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December 2004 Title V Evaluation Report 2003-04: E&R Section Page, Bethany

9 View Abstract

For the 2003-04 school year, WCPSS applied for and received Title V funding for "education reform and school improvement." WCPSS used funds to support two International Baccalaureate (IB) programs: the Middle Years Programme (MYP) at Broughton High School and the Diploma Programme (DP) at Garner Senior High School. Additional funds were used to fund a senior evaluator for school accountability to provide data to inform school improvement and student achievement. The report provides evidence of implementation and outcomes.

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November 2004 Fast Forword Evaluation: 2003-04 Baenen, Nancy
Germuth, Amy

22 View Abstract

In 2003-04, 1,912 students in 16 elementary and 6 middle schools in the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) participated in Fast ForWord program. Evaluation findings indicate that elementary and middle school participants made short-term gains averaging 22-55 months (approximately 2-4 years) of gain in terms of foundational listening and reading skills after nine weeks of intervention. When compared to students who had not received Fast ForWord instruction in 2003-04, both groups appeared to make similar gains on the Reading EOG over one year, although 7th and 8th graders served via Fast ForWord made greater gains on the math EOG. Over two years, students who received Fast ForWord in 2002-03 again performed similarly to their at-risk peers who had not received services in Reading EOG scores and gains. These findings suggest that Fast ForWord appears to impact foundational reading skills, but is not sufficient on its own to influence higher level reading skills and comprehension as measured by EOGs.

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November 2004 Title I End-of-Grade Test Results 2003-04: Grades 3-5 Paeplow, Colleen

6 View Abstract

In 2003-04, the Title I program was expanded to serve students in grades 3-5. Similar to the Title I K-2 program, the 3-5 program offered accelerated literacy intervention. The vast majority of students were served using the Fast Track Reading curriculum. Fast Track Reading combines explicit reading skills and phonics instruction with comprehension coaching and fluency practice. Fast Track is designed to accelerate student learning to raise students' performance to grade level standards. The demographics of Title I students served in grades 3-5 differs from Wake County Public Schools (WCPSS) grade 3-5 students due to the focus on serving students at risk of failure. The percentage of Title I students across grades 3-5 scoring at Level III or IV (grade level) on End-of-Grade (EOG) tests doubled. Students in grade 5 showed the greatest improvement, followed by students in grades 3 and 4. Increases from Spring 2003 and Spring 2004 in the percentage of students scoring at Level III or IV were strong for all Title I subgroups compared to WCPSS overall.

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October 2004 Annual Performance Report 2003-2004 Magnet Schools Assistance Program Grant Penta, Mary

146 View Abstract

The Magnet Schools Assistance Program Annual Performance Report Year 3 (2003-2004) was implemented from September 1, 2003, through August 31, 2004 in the WCPSS. Staff members implemented activities this U.S. Department of Education grant project. They built upon the foundation established in Years 1 and 2 and endeavored to fully accomplish the scope and objectives of the project by the end of Year 3. They sought to reach all performance benchmarks established for Year 3 as well as to make up for any benchmarks not fully achieved in Years 1 and 2. When senior members of the project staff realized that not every objective would be fully completed by the end of Year 3, they requested and received a no-cost extension from the MSAP office for an additional project year (September 1, 2004-August 31, 2005). Schools participating in the project and their magnet themes are: Brooks Elementary School - Museums, Joyner Elementary School - Language Explorations, Millbrook Elementary School - International Baccalaureate, Powell Elementary School - Visual and Performing Arts, and Moore Square Middle School - Museums. The project focuses on four major purposes and has objectives related to each. Annual benchmarks have been established to measure success in achieving the objectives. The four MSAP purposes are listed below, followed by a summary of accomplishments or deficits in meeting the Year 3 benchmarks for each purpose.

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October 2004 WCPSS Outcomes Summary for 2003-04, With an Emphasis on Achievement Gap Status Baenen, Nancy
Dulaney, Chuck
Yaman, Kimberly

22 View Abstract

The Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) has seen positive changes in patterns of achievement and dropout rates over the past several years overall and by subgroup. The most positive one-year subgroup changes related to dropout rates for Black students and Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) for minority, low-income, and limited English proficient (LEP) students. However, many achievement gaps remain, and the system continues to work towards optimal achievement for all students and closing achievement gaps.

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May 2004 21st Century Grant Summer Program Evaluation: 2003 Baenen, Nancy
Paeplow, Colleen

11 View Abstract

The 2003 21st Century Grant summer program served 370 students at five elementary school sites--Carver, Hodge Road, Knightdale, Lockhart, and Zebulon. Grade levels served and program dates varied by location. The summer program provided reading intervention to students identified as in need of academic assistance. Seventy-one percent of summer program participants were free or reduced-price lunch recipients (FRL), 34% were classified as limited English proficient (LEP), 41% were Black/African American, and 39% were Hispanic/Latino students. These subgroups were over-represented relative to their percentages within the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) population. Approximately 42% of the summer program participants entered the program with below grade level scores. Academic outcomes are not yet available for analysis.

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May 2004 Partnership for Educational Success 2002-03: Implementation and Outcomes Baenen, Nancy
Harlow, Kristin2

16 View Abstract

The Partnership for Educational Success (PES) is a collaboration between the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) and Wake County Human Services. The primary goal of PES is for the agencies to work together to help students achieve grade-level performance. PES provides family-centered services to at-risk students and their families. In 2002-03 PES provided services to 269 at-risk students and their families. PES-funded staff also supported non-PES families, but no data was collected regarding these families. In 2002-03, over half of PES students scored at or above grade level before PES participation. These students may have been siblings of the primary referred students, who did score below grade level, although corroborative information is not available. Teacher survey data indicated that PES families are more involved with the school after PES participation. Test score outcomes of students in grades K-8 were inconclusive; results are similar to free and reduced-price lunch eligible students (FRL) as a whole. More data are necessary to provide a clear picture of the success of PES in meeting its academic goals.

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April 2004 Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) K-2 Evaluation 2002-03 Baenen, Nancy
Harlow, Kristin2
Paeplow, Colleen

33 View Abstract

The Title I/Accelerated Learning Program K-2 Literacy Program (ALP K-2) served 4,732 students in kindergarten, first, and second grade identified as at risk of failure and in need of assistance in language arts. For a variety of reasons, over half of the students who scored below grade level on local assessments as of spring 2002 were not served, and others who scored at grade level were served. Nearly all of the staff surveyed reported that the program was an effective method of improving students' literacy skills. ALP students' literacy skills did improve. However, the mean gains in print concept scores (for kindergarten) and book level scores (for grades 1 and 2) were no different than for similar students not served. Approximately the same percentage of students were on grade level in spring 2003 as in spring 2002.

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April 2004 Project Achieve: Adapting the Brazosport Model to a Large LEA Baenen, Nancy
Speas, Carol

18 View Abstract

Project Achieve is a major Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) instructional initiative to improve student achievement adapted from a Brazosport, Texas model. The number of schools involved increased from 8 to 13 in 2002-03. Results were positive. All Project Achieve elementary and middle schools met the state ABCs High Growth standard both years (up from five in spring 2001), and nearly all schools increased the percent of students at or above grade level in their first year. In Year 2, compared to other WCPSS students, participation in Project Achieve was generally associated with significantly higher gains in mathematics and similar gains in reading (when background characteristics were controlled through regression analyses). Staff members also expressed more positive opinions about the academic program in their schools than in the past.

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January 2004 Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) Grades 3-8: Evaluation 2002-03 Baenen, Nancy

36 View Abstract

The Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) began in the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) in 1999-2000 as an out-of-school time intervention to support students scoring below grade level. Since then, flexibility in use of these funds has increased, along with the percentage of schools using the funds to support low achievers during the school day. In 2002-03, over 70% of traditional calendar schools reported providing at least a portion of their ALP services during the school day, followed by after-school sessions (about 40%), and Saturday sessions (20%). At year-round schools, intersession continues to be the most common time for ALP at the elementary (82%). However, year-round middle schools provided ALP most commonly during the school day (83%), with only 34% using intersessions. Changes in use of ALP funds have made it increasingly difficult to clearly identify which students these funds supported. Although all schools reported that students who scored below grade level were supported through ALP, data on individual students suggests that the percentage of these students in ALP declined from 59% in 2001-02 to 35% in 2002-03. The lower participation rates are partially due to under-reporting, but clearer accountability for serving students is needed.

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January 2004 Project Achieve Evaluation: Year Two, 2002-03 Speas, Carol

38 View Abstract

Project Achieve is a major Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) instructional initiative to improve student achievement adapted from a Brazosport, Texas model. The number of schools involved increased from 8 to 13 in 2002-03. Results were generally positive. All Project Achieve elementary and middle schools met the state ABCs High Growth standard in spring 2003 (up from five in spring 2001), and 10 of 13 schools increased the percent of students at or above grade level. Compared to other WCPSS students, participation in Project Achieve was generally associated with significantly higher gains in mathematics and similar gains in reading (when background characteristics were controlled through regression analyses). Staff members also expressed more positive opinions about the academic program in their schools than in the past.

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December 2003 A Study of the 1995 WCPSS 9TH - Grade Students with Disabilities Cohort Haynie, Glenda

27 View Abstract

In a study of 5,226 first-time 1995 9th-grade students, 12% of the students were students with disabilities (SWD). Academic performance indicators for the SWD group were far below the overall cohort indicators. Difficulties for students with disabilities could be observed beginning in ninth grade. The average GPA of SWD students at the end of ninth grade was 1.79(a D+ average) compared to an average GPA of 2.58 (a C+ average) for the overall cohort. Just 57% of the SWD cohort graduated (defined as completion of 12th grade with a diploma or certificate) compared to 77% of the overall cohort. Of the graduating SWD students, only 36% took the SAT with an average total score of 949, while 76% of the overall cohort took the SAT with an average total score of 1065. Black SWD students were less likely to graduate than White SWD students (45% compared to 66%). Behaviorally/Emotionally Disabled (BED) Black female students were least likely to graduate (13%). The 43% of SWD students who dropped out had a ninth grade average GPA of 0.82 (below a D average).

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October 2003 Wake County Safe Schools/Healthy Students Grant Final Report 1999-2003 Baenen, Nancy
Harlow, Kristin2

51 View Abstract

The Safe Schools/Healthy Students Grant (SS/HS) was a three-year grant sponsored by a collaboration between the federal Departments of Health and Human Services, Juvenile Justice, and Education. The SS/HS Grant improved collaboration and communication across community agencies. During the grant period perceptions of safety improved among WCPSS students and staff, and juvenile arrests for violence and substance abuse decreased. However, school crime and violence rates, suspensions, and security violations did not decrease as hoped. Many SS/HS funded programs showed promising results, especially Teen Court (increased participation and decreased suspensions for participants) and NovaNET (80% of courses students attempted were completed successfully). Overall, SS/HS provided resources for community change, and new ideas for addressing school safety in the future.

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September 2003 Fast ForWord Evaluation, 2002-03 Baenen, Nancy
Overbay, Amy

18 View Abstract

The 2001-02 evaluation of Fast ForWord established that participants experienced short-term gains in language and reading skills, as measured by the Woodcock Diagnostic Reading Battery. EOG results also indicated that participants made significant gains in reading achievement. This evaluation examined the reading achievement of 2002-03 Fast ForWord participants relative to a comparison group, and investigated factors that predict success on reading EOG tests. Results for 2002-03 participants indicate that participants made significant gains on EOGs, but that their achievement growth pattern was not significantly different than that of matched non-participants. The short and long versions of the Teacher Observation Survey (TOS) predicted success equally well, and no demographic characteristics predicted success consistently. Thus, no simple means of selecting the most appropriate participants were identified.

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July 2003 Annual Performance Report 2002-2003 Magnet Schools Assistance Program Grant Penta, Mary

180 View Abstract

Magnet Schools Assistance Program Annual Performance Report Year 2 (2002-03) From September 1, 2002, through June 30, 2003, the staff members of the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) 2001-04 Magnet Schools Assistance Program (MSAP) grant have successfully built upon the foundation they established in Year 1. This year they have endeavored to make up for any objectives not fully achieved in Year 1 and to attain all of their Year 2 objectives. Schools participating in the project and their magnet themes are: Brooks Elementary School - Museums, Joyner Elementary School - Language Explorations, Millbrook Elementary School - International Baccalaureate, Powell Elementary School - Visual and Performing Arts, and Moore Square Middle School - Museums. The project focuses on four major purposes and has objectives related to each. Annual benchmarks have been established to measure success in achieving the objectives. The four MSAP purposes are listed below, followed by a summary of accomplishments or deficits in meeting the Year 2 benchmarks for each purpose.

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July 2003 Has ALP Helped Low-Achieving Students? Baenen, Nancy
Yaman, Kimberly

2 View Abstract

To help accomplish Goal 2003, WCPSS allocated money in 1999 for supplemental instructional support through the Accelerated Learning Program (ALP). Analyses of the program's 2001-02 results suggest that ALP was effective in promoting both achievement growth and performance at grades 3-8. ALP students showed high growth based on ABCs standards, and more than half were able to move from below to above grade level between spring 2001 and spring 2002 (compared to 38% in reading and 41% in math before ALP began).

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May 2003 Safe Schools/Healthy Students Grant Year 4 Mid-Year Performance Report Project Status October 1, 2002 - April 30, 2003 Baenen, Nancy
Harlow, Kristin2

6 View Abstract

The Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) is currently in the extension year, or Year 4, of the Safe Schools/Healthy Students grant. This report outlines the activities continued in the extension year, and a status report on each activity for the first part of Year 4.

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April 2003 Advanced Placement Exam Results 2001-2002 Regan, Roger

30 View Abstract

Students at 15 Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) high schools took approximately 4,878 Advanced Placement exams offered by the College Board in 2001-02. With 20% of all juniors and seniors in the district taking at least one AP exam, the percent attaining a score of 3 or higher on a 5-point scale (the score typically needed to qualify for college course credit) reached a 10-year high of 80.5%, up 3.3 percentage points from the previous year. WCPSS' overall success rate was higher than that of comparable large school districts, and 17 percentage points higher than the rate for the nation as a whole. On the five most frequently taken AP exams, the percent of scores that were 3 or higher rose an average of 8.6 points.

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March 2003 Accelerated Learning Program (ALP): Grade 3-8 Evaluation 2001-02 Baenen, Nancy
Lindblad, Mark
Yaman, Kimberly

107 View Abstract

WCPSS initiated the Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) in 1999-2000 as the major new intervention to help all students reach grade-level performance in reading and math. Analyses of the program's third year results show that overall, changes in both achievement growth and performance support the effectiveness of ALP and other assistance at grades 3-8.

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February 2003 NovaNET Student Outcomes 2001-2002 Baenen, Nancy
Harlow, Kristin2

23 View Abstract

In the 2001-02 school year, NovaNET students earned significantly higher GPAs and fewer F's than before participating in NovaNET. NovaNET students did not show significantly greater gains than students in a comparison group that had similar demographic and academic characteristics; however, analyses revealed that the two groups varied somewhat in terms of prior suspensions, so results should be interpreted with caution. Some schools had much greater participation and student success than others. Strategies used by successful NovaNET programs include individualizing coursework; supplemental counseling and behavior modification; selecting the most appropriate students; requiring students to sign a contract promising to complete the course; and giving offline assignments to supplement NovaNET. Extending successful school practices to all schools could increase overall program impact.

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February 2003 Project Achieve Evaluation Report: Year One, 2001-2002 Speas, Carol

71 View Abstract

This is an evaluation of the pilot year of Project Achieve, a major local instructional initiative at six elementary schools and two middle schools to help reach the WCPSS goal of 95% of students at or above grade level. Participating schools had a higher percentage of low-income students and low-achieving students and slightly less stable student populations than the district as a whole. The initiative is based on the same principles and instructional process applied in the Brazosport, Texas school district, with modifications tailored to local needs and based on the NC Standard Course of Study. Project training and development did occur as planned from early 2001 to implementation in the 2001-02 school year. Participating schools did exceed ABCs growth and performance standards of the previous (baseline) year, as evidenced by annual NC ABCs Accountability System reports. Additionally, parents and staff expressed more positive opinions about the academic program in participating schools.

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February 2003 Title VI: Annual Evaluation Report 2001-2002 Overbay, Amy
Speas, Carol

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In the 2001-02 school year, Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) implemented a project within an innovative assistance program area of Title VI- the provision of performing arts teachers within magnet elementary schools to provide arts education - under the "promising educational reform projects" category. Twelve arts teachers, representing between 0.3 and 1.0 FTE each, served in six elementary magnet schools: Fuller, Powell, Washington, Wendell, Conn, and Wiley. Also, in spring 2001, funding was allocated for planning and training activities for a new school improvement/reorganization effort at eight schools. WPSS Instructional Services Division identified a set of six schools showing historical patterns of below-expectation growth, and two schools volunteered to participate in "Project Achieve." Training and development for the eight schools did occur as planned in July - October, 2001. Results are shared.

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November 2002 Voyager Summer Academy 2002 Results Baenen, Nancy
Banks, Karen
Paeplow, Colleen

40 View Abstract

The Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) provides a comprehensive program of extra support for students in grades K-8 who have not yet reached grade level standards. In the summer of 2002, the Voyager Summer Academy was offered in WCPSS at grades 2-8 to students scoring at Level I or II (below grade level) in reading or math. (The State of North Carolina required a summer intervention at grades 3, 5, and 8, and WCPSS offered the program at the other grade levels as well.) WCPSS utilized the Voyager Time Warp series, which is a summer reading intervention program. Designed to decrease summer learning loss and reduce the achievement gap, Voyager Time Warp is based on the premise that lessons generating high student interest, combined with academically challenging material, will increase student motivation and improve student achievement. The Time Warp reading program is a four-hour-a day, four-week program. WCPSS also adopted Voyager's one-hour-per-day V-Math series for use in combination with the reading intervention. A variety of methods were used to assess the Voyager program including student, parent, teacher, and site coordinator surveys, a quality assurance checklist, in-depth interviews, and a focus group. Voyager pre/post assessments designed by the publisher and results on pre/post North Carolina End-of-Grade (EOG) tests were also used to evaluate Voyager's effectiveness.

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July 2002 Annual Performance Report 2001-2002 Magnet Schools Assistance Program Grant Penta, Mary

123 View Abstract

In 2001-02, WCPSS Magnet Schools Assistance Program (MSAP) grant began implementation for three schools in the project and planned for two others. Schools in their first implementation year were: Joyner Elementary School, Language Explorations Millbrook Elementary School, International Baccalaureate Primary Years Programme Powell Elementary School ,Visual and Performing Arts Schools in their planning year included Brooks Elementary School ( Museums), and Moore Square Middle School ( Museums). Objective accomplishment as of the end of year 1 is described.

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June 2002 Advanced Placement Exam Results 2000-2001 Kaase, Kristopher
Paeplow, Colleen

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The Advanced Placement (AP) program offers college-level courses to high school students. Many colleges and universities provide course credit to students who earn a high score on the end-of-year exams. Almost 60% of United States high schools offer AP course work, and more than 800,000 high school students participated in AP programs during the 2000-2001 school year (College Board, 2001). All 15 comprehensive high schools in the WCPSS offer AP courses. Enrollment in Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) AP courses was approximately 6,900 in 2000-01. Many students took more than one AP course. A total of 4,320 AP examinations were taken by 2,223 WCPSS students at the end of the school year. This report examines AP exam results for the WCPSS with comparisons to other large school systems, the state of North Carolina, the South, and the United States.

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June 2002 Wake County Safe Schools/Healthy Students Project Year Three - Mid-Year Performance Report October 1, 2001 - May 31, 2002 Baenen, Nancy
Harlow, Kristin2
Overbay, Amy

41 View Abstract

The Wake County Safe Schools/Healthy Students (SS/HS) Project was a three-year federal cooperative effort sponsored by the Department of Education, the Department of Juvenile Justice, and the Department of Health and Human Services. This report focuses on year 3 results. While all students were impacted indirectly, 3,315 individual students were served directly by SS/HS intervention programs, and 16,100 students participated in group prevention activities; SS/HS disproportionately served the higher risk students in the system directly as intended. The grant had many positive benefits in Year 3. A safe school environment was promoted by security system installation, and use of the WAVE Line. Alcohol, drug, and violence prevention and early intervention programs were promoted through a Communities in Schools (CIS/CLP) mentoring program, which had a positive effect on student achievement. Teen Court expanded the number of youth served, as well as the range of programs available for those youth. In terms of school and community mental health preventive and treatment intervention services, Children of Substance Abuse (COSA) groups drastically reduced the number of students reporting that they would use violence in the future. The preschool Second Step program resulted in teachers spending less time disciplining students. Five different curricula related to SS/HS reached over 15,000 WCPSS students. NovaNET improved students' ability to pass courses and get back on track to graduation.

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May 2002 Title VI: Annual Evaluation Report 2000-2001 Speas, Carol

18 View Abstract

The Wake County Public School System developed a project within an innovative assistance program area of Title VI--the provision of performing arts teachers within magnet elementary schools to provide arts education--under the "promising educational reform projects" category. Funding provided to private non-profit schools was used primarily for curricular materials. In the spring of 2001, Title VI funding was allocated for planning and training activities for new school improvement/reorganization efforts at seven schools under the "3a. Promising Educational Reform Programs: Effective Schools" category. This report provides information on implementation and attainment of objectives.

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February 2002 NovaNET 2000-2001: Analyses of Student Outcomes Relative to a Comparison Group Baenen, Nancy
Harlow, Kristin2

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NovaNET is an on-line computerized instructional system that provides students with self-paced instruction for many North Carolina high school courses. This evaluation looks at outcomes for students participating in the NovaNET program and compares them with outcomes for a group of students with similar characteristics who did not participate in NovaNET. The primary positive finding was that the number of failing grades decreased significantly for students who participated in NovaNET, while a slight increase occurred for matched students. The GPA for NovaNET students showed a significant increase, but the comparison group increased about the same amount (difference between increases were not significant). NovaNET appeared to have more of a positive impact on math and social studies course grades than on English and science course grades. The pass rate for NovaNET science courses was only 50%. NovaNET did not appear to impact suspensions in 2000-2001; rates for NovaNET and matched students were statistically similar. NovaNET students were more likely to drop out of school in 2000-2001 than the comparison students who had a lower dropout rate than WCPSS overall; the change in drop-out rates should be examined again over the next few years. Overall, NovaNET seems to help students pass classes. However, more specific findings are difficult to obtain due to the newness of the program, and the difficulty of creating an accurately matched comparison group.

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February 2002 The Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) 2000-01: Student Participation and Effectiveness Baenen, Nancy
Lindblad, Mark
Yaman, Kimberly

71 View Abstract

The Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) is the major initiative that the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) is using to help all students reach grade level performance in reading and math. In 2000-01, ALP's second year of implementation, the program expanded from grades 3-8 to K-12. This report focuses on student participation rates and the impact of the ALP program.

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January 2002 Summer Academy in the Wake County Public Schools: An Evaluation of the 2001 Program Holdzkom, David

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Summer Academy in the Wake County Public Schools: An Evaluation of the 2001 Program

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December 2001 Strategy 17: NovaNET Online Learning System Year 2 Program Evaluation Baenen, Nancy

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Wake County Public Schools have addressed the needs of at-risk students with an array of academic and alternative programs that reflect serious commitment of funds and time. The 1999-2000 academic year witnessed the beginning of a 9 million dollar, three-year, community-wide collaboration between existing programs and agencies expressly intended to coordinate efforts to serve at-risk children and their families. The grant, entitled Safe Schools Healthy Students, was funded by the Department of Justice, the Department of Health and Human Services, and the Department of Education in an effort to promote safe, inviting, and optimal learning environments for all students. The program was built upon a broad collection of 17 strategies aimed at addressing the risk and resilience factors associated with school safety and student success. Each strategy included a three-year sequence of action steps, focused on strengthening resources or services within the school system. These services ranged from improving at risk screening and referral strategies, to mentoring, to substance abuse prevention, to improving school security.

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November 2001 The Effectiveness of the Wake Summerbridge Summer Enrichment Program Baenen, Nancy
Harlow, Kristin2

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Wake Summerbridge is an enrichment program that has supported selected WCPSS middle school students for a number of years. This evaluation compared subsequent academic performance, suspensions and dropout rates of students who had participated in the program with a comparison group of students with similar characteristics who did not participate in the program. The main positive finding was that dropout rates were much lower for Summerbridge students than for the comparison group (1% versus 13%). Achievement scores and grade point averages showed a slight but consistent advantage in absolute terms for Summerbridge students over the comparison group. The differences were not statistically significant, although they may have some educational significance. The percentage of students receiving F's and suspension rates actually favored the comparison group. However, the higher dropout rate among comparison students may account for the lower number of F's earned by this group. Some cautions must be kept in mind when interpreting these findings. Sample sizes were relatively small which makes statistical significance more difficult to detect (about 80 per group). Groups could differ in ways that could not be determined from school system data files (e.g., attitude toward school, rigor of course selections, middle versus higher income status). Given the results, the cost of providing the service should also be considered in decisions about future funding.

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October 2001 Wake County Safe Schools/Healthy Students Project Year Two - Year-End Performance Report April 1, 2001 - September 30, 2001 Baenen, Nancy
Harlow, Kristin2
Overbay, Amy
Reichstetter, Rosemary

61 View Abstract

The Wake County Safe Schools/Healthy Students (SS/HS) Project is a three-year federal cooperative effort sponsored by the Department of Education, the Department of Juvenile Justice, and the Department of Health and Human Services. Together, these departments have encouraged organizations and agencies across the country to develop initiatives that prevent violence and substance abuse in schools by addressing six major elements determined to be critical in sustaining safe and healthy schools and students. Wake County has responded to this challenge by identifying four goals that correspond with these six elements, and by adopting seventeen strategies for carrying out these goals. By focusing on collaboration and cooperation with partner agencies and the community, the Wake County project is promoting the implementation and refinement of sustainable efforts to create a safe, orderly, and drug-free learning environment within county schools.

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July 2001 Structure of Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) Efforts 2000-01 Baenen, Nancy
Yaman, Kimberly

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This report focuses on the structure of instructional assistance available through ALP to students who show low achievement. Information is also provided on other programs available to these students. For many years, WCPSS has had instructional support available through a variety of grant-funded programs to students with special needs. However, student needs could not be fully met through these original resources. To help accomplish goal 2003 (for 95% of students to score proficient on EOG tests), local dollars were allocated for supplemental instructional support.

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May 2001 Comparing Student Performance at Program Magnet, Year-Round Magnet, and Non-Magnet Elementary Schools Penta, Mary

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This evaluation provides an overview of demographic characteristics and student achievement outcomes among Wake County Public School System elementary schools, when these schools are categorized as schools of choice (program magnets and calendar magnets) or traditional schools (non-magnets). Data were drawn from school-level outcomes reported in the 2000-2001 Wake County School Profiles. Central to the study is the conclusion that there are no significant differences in schools' ABCs Performance Composites when they are statistically adjusted to equalize differences in race and socioeconomic status. Through the WCPSS Magnet Program, families can take advantage of opportunities for school choice without sacrificing the level of academic performance their students can expect to achieve. The school system also benefits because magnet schools promote diversity and help to optimize the use of facilities throughout the system.

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October 2000 Wake County Safe Schools/Healthy Students Year One - End of Year Performance Report June 1, 2000 - September 30, 2000 Paeplow, Colleen
Reichstetter, Rosemary

54 View Abstract

This is the Year One - End-of-Year Performance Report for the Wake County Safe Schools/Healthy Students Project. The Wake County Safe Schools/Healthy Students Project is a part of a federal initiative. The Department of Education, the Department of Juvenile Justice, and the Department of Health and Human Services have joined together in an initiative to stop violence and substance abuse within schools. Each of the three departments has challenged organizations and agencies over the country to develop projects that address six elements. Wake County has done so through developing four goals and seventeen strategies. Within this reporting period, training has taken place, programs have been designed and set up, and full implementation is scheduled to begin during fall 2000. Overall, county partners and agencies involved with the project show pride in the enormous accomplishments that so many have made within the short period of one year. The subsequent outcome as well as eventual impact of the project's efforts are of increasing interest to the stakeholders in the endeavor.

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February 2000 Impact of Instructional Assistance 1998-99: Accountability Report Baenen, Nancy

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WCPSS has had efforts in place to support low achieving students for many years. However, about 20% of WCPSS students do not score high enough to be considered "on grade level" on the End-Of-Grade (EOG) tests given across North Carolina in grades 3-8. WCPSS and the community have adopted the goal that 95% of our students will score on grade level in grades 3 and 8 by 2003. Staff recognized that the 95% achievement goal could not be accomplished unless we tried new ways to help low achieving students and provided additional resources to schools. For the 1998-99 school year, previously funded efforts such as special education, Title I, English as a Second Language, and Student Support Teams continued, but approximately $5 million in additional funds (some grant and some local) were also allocated to schools to support low achieving students. This report focuses on whether the additional funds made a difference in the progress of low achieving students and what techniques seemed to make the most positive difference for students.

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January 2000 Impact of Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) and Other Assistance 1999-2000 Baenen, Nancy
Lloyd, Wanda

96 View Abstract

ALP and other assistance appeared to have some positive impact on achievement, primarily at the elementary level.

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